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Finding the formula of copper carbonate

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Introduction

Finding the formula of copper carbonate Introduction One of the three following formulae is the formula of copper carbonate. I am going to find this doing three easy calculations. You just have to mass of copper carbonate by the Mr copper carbonate and then multiplying the answer by the Mr of CuO. In my case, the mass of copper carbonate will be 1.33 g. Here are the three formulae: 1. CuCO3 ==> CuO + CO2 2. CuCO3 . Cu (OH)2 . H2O ==> 2CuO + CO2 + 2H2O 3. CuCO3 . Cu (OH)2 . 5H2O ==> 2CuO + CO2 + 6H2O Hypothesis I think that the right equation will be the second one because the first one is too small and it can't be, and the second one is too big, there are 5 H2O's on one side and 6 on the other. ...read more.

Middle

After this, I put the crucible in the pipe clay triangle as shown above and heat it strongly for a bit. While doing this make sure that you lift the lid every now and then to allow the gasses to escape. When the copper carbonate goes from turquoise to dark black, that's the time to stop. Take the crucible off the pipe clay triangle and wait it to cool down, then reweigh it with the lid and write down the result. To wake it a fair test repeat it a few times and write down the results. Results First try Second try Third try Fourth try Average Weight of crucible with top (g) 40.49 38.58 22.58 38.54 35.05 Weight of crucible with top and copper carbonate (g) ...read more.

Conclusion

Conclusion In conclusion I can say that the second equation was the nearest to my average copper carbonate mass. I also learned that the mass of the copper carbonate decreased of weight because the CO2 present in the solution escaped while the copper carbonate was being heated, this is because we had to open the lid every now and then. Improvements for the experiment To improve the results of the experiment, we could have used the same crucible and crucible top to get a more precise average, and we could have also used the same amount of copper carbonate each time so probably the average weight of it could be near the result I got. ...read more.

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