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'Frankenstein and the monster are often confused', Discuss the parallels between Frankenstein and his monster throughout the book.

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Introduction

'Frankenstein and the monster are often confused', Discuss the parallels between Frankenstein and his monster throughout the book. Children dress up as the hideous creature they call Frankenstein, a man-made man, on Halloween night, to terrify the neighbourhood. However, Frankenstein is not the name of the creature itself, but the creature's creator. It is ironic that the name feared in popular myth today is the name of the creator and not the monster, and indeed it is perhaps justified, because without the creator, there would have been no creature and no murders. Throughout the lives of both Frankenstein and his hand made child, there are many parallels between the two and this further confuses them into the image that they are one and the same. In this essay I shall be considering these parallels. Frankenstein grew up in a loving family, surrounded by maternal and filial love until his mother tragically died. He was then without his main source of female guidance, and females traditionally provide compassion and support for males. Frankenstein lost his sister's influence when he left for university and lost close contact with Elizabeth. ...read more.

Middle

Frankenstein p.55 He derives pleasure from sources of great beauty and beauty is seen to stimulate his happiness. This can be remarked upon as very shallow because beauty is not always permanent or necessarily good. The creature also gives great reverence to beautiful things and associates beauty with innate goodness. "...was disturbed by the approach of a beautiful child...an idea seized me that this little creature was inprejudice..." He thinks that because William is young and beautiful he will also be a pleasant child, but he fastly learns not to presume that physical perfection and loving souls go hand in hand. As a parallel to this Frankenstein believes that ugliness is associated with evil, and hence presumes the creature to be wretched and evil because he was deformed. Their opinions on this are similar and one can imagine that if their roles were reversed, they would behave exactly the same as each other, it is only their different situations that casts different lights of bias among them, not that their personalities are much different. Frankenstein originally holds power over the creature, as he is the divine creator, and the creature's fate is in Frankenstein's hands. ...read more.

Conclusion

They both call eachother, and indeed call themselves at various points, wretches throughout. By Shelley associating a particular word with both Frankenstein and the creature, we can see the parallel of their miserable and desperate situations. "You...miserable wretch..." Frankenstein Frankenstein and the creature are both referred to as spiritual beings. The creature is referred to as the devil, because the devil started out as an angel, but corruption led him to commit evil acts, just as the creature is born with a loving and pure heart, but malevolence grips him after hardship and pain. "But it is even so; the fallen angel becomes the malicious devil!" of the creature Similarly, Frankenstein is compared to God, because he created man and in the bible it states that only God can create man. "When thus he is noble and godlike in ruin" of Frankenstein Their comparisons to the universal powers are parallel. However, the extreme opposite of to whom they are compared with highlights a final point. The creature and Frankenstein are so very different in many ways. Although they have similar characters, because they are placed in such opposite situations generally, their personalities although similar are projected in a different light. The book highlights the importance of circumstances and environment in growing up and surviving the world as a good and balanced person. ...read more.

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