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Frankenstein" by Mary ShelleyFrom your reading of the novel, say whether or not Victor Frankenstein is more monstrous than the monster whom he creates.

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Introduction

"Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley From your reading of the novel, say whether or not Victor Frankenstein is more monstrous than the monster whom he creates. In the novel of "Frankenstein", the monster is an alter ego of Victor Frankenstein. This makes it hard to depict which of the two characters are of a greater monstrosity. However, to come to a conclusion I will now examine both the characters in turn and look at events in the story which might help us determine which of the two characters are more monstrous. Victor derives from an educated background, with his family being "one of the most distinguished" in the republic that they live in. Many of his "ancestors had been for many years counsellors and syndics" and his father had "filled several public situations with honour and reputation". "No human could have passed a happier childhood" than Victor. He grew up in luxurious settings with his mother, Caroline, giving him her full attention. The first sign of kindness that Victor shows in the novel, is when his mother adopts a baby girl who is an "orphan beggar" named Elizabeth. Victor warmly welcomes her into the family and treats her as if she is "more than (a) sister" to him. As Victor gets older, he grows to be a bright young man with the world as his oyster. He has noble ambition and is eager to learn with a "thirst for knowledge". We also know that Victor is capable of "closest friendship" and deep love, as he obtains a good childhood friend named Henry Clerval. ...read more.

Middle

He has strong ambition and eager to learn. However, one gets the impression that when he starts to create life, he is trying to take the role of God, and becomes obsessed with gaining glory and power so much, that he forgets the importance of love and family. Victor also fails to care for the monster, which in my opinion is highly monstrous as it just like abandoning a new born baby. Furthermore, Victor acts selfishly in many occasions throughout the play. He decides to create a female companion for the monster, to stop the monster chasing him. But he goes against his promise when he thinks about what the world will think of him, if a "race of monsters" attacks the world. Everything Victor does is centred on himself and he only thinks about what benefit it would be to himself, when he considers an action. Now that I have considered Victor as a character, I will now examine the monster. The monster starts off his life as an innocent creature; however his abnormal figure and demented shape caused people to be scared of him and reject him. When the monster walked into an old man's home to "obtain food and shelter", the old man: -turned on hearing a noise; and, perceiving (the monster), shrieked loudly, and, quitting the hut, ran across the fields. (Volume 2, Chapter 3, p108) All the man had to see was monsters figure to make him run away without any enquiry. This suggests that the creature's look posed a threat to everyone who saw him, and led to him being alienated from society. ...read more.

Conclusion

I have come to this conclusion because despite having a perfect childhood, an abundance of money and numerous qualities in life, Victor turns evil and monstrous in greed for glory. However the monster turns monstrous due to the actions of someone else (Victor); he is angered by the fact that his creator made him ugly and did not want to help him survive once he was created. Victor also fails to accept responsibility. Once he had created the monster, he had to realise it was just like a new life entering the world. It is the creator's duty to look after the new born, and guide it until it was able to manage by itself. Yet Victor just does not care about what happens to the monster, as it is of irregular shape and figure. In my view, this is just like abandoning a new born child because it looks unusual. Even though the monster commits more serious crimes than Victor, I believe that Victor is still more monstrous as his crimes had no reason behind them. What did the monster do to make Victor abandon him? Whereas the monster commits his crimes because he is robbed of love and cheated by Victor. Till the very end of Victor's life, he does not learn from his mistakes and realise that pursuing a desire is not always worth it. As a result, he loses virtually all his immediate family and his life. However, the monster realises that what he has done was wrong and expresses genuine sorrow. Therefore I continue to believe that Victor is more monstrous. Word Count: 2,703 words. ?? ?? ?? ?? Page 1 of 6 Sayinthen Vivekanantham Candidate Number: 9129 Centre Number: 64225 ...read more.

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