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Frankenstein essay

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Introduction

Frankenstein essay In this essay I will show how Mary Shelley manipulates the reader's view of the monster throughout her novel "Frankenstein." I will show that Shelley creates many different impressions on the reader, through various methods, to change their opinion throughout the book. "Frankenstein" is a romantic gothic horror novel written in 1818 by a young woman named Mary Shelley. It includes the classic gothic themes of romance, horror, religion and good and evil. "Frankenstein", however, is centred on a issue still debated today; whether trying to change life is playing God and if it will lead to dire consequences. At the time of writing Mary Shelley was 16, the wife of Percy Shelley and staying in the Swiss Alps with Lord Byron and her husband. One of the more classic methods Shelley uses to manipulate her readers is setting. In chapter 5 the setting gives a dark and gothic atmosphere, which tells the reader that the monster is horrifying and to be feared. "One in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out." This quote is giving the reader the idea of isolation; something surreptitious and forbidden. Mary Shelley does this by using a classic gothic horror setting; the night which traditionally implies evil, secrecy and darkness, the bad weather, used to make everything more dank and dismal, and the burnt down candle, a symbol of long hours of frenzied work and manic concentration. ...read more.

Middle

This quote shows why Frankenstein has come to this place; he wants peace and isolation, and to think about more than just his own personal tragedy. "They elevated me from all little ness of feeling, and although they did not remove my grief, they subdued and tranquillized it." The language used to describe the setting is more elaborate in this chapter, which reflects the increased grandeur of the scene. This is done to create a sense of awe from the reader and to show them how isolated the setting is, which affects their perception of the monster when he is introduced to the chapter. This setting affects the reader's perception of the monster because the fact he is living in such a place shows us two things about him that have considerably changed since chapter 5. The first is that he has realized that he will never fit into human society, so he has chosen to use his superhuman physical abilities to live in a place where humans cannot reach. The second is that he has gained independence and can now look after himself, physically and mentally. This is a big change from chapter 5 where he was like a small child, and could not understand why humans wouldn't accept him. "He bounded over crevices in the ice, over which I had walked with caution." This quote shows how the monster has adapted, he is comfortable in his surroundings, and much more competent than any human could be in these surroundings. ...read more.

Conclusion

The language in this chapter is mainly concerned with the emotion that the monster and Frankenstein are enunciating. Words such as "passion", "hatred", "desire" and "wretchedness" are all used to show the reader how the characters are feeling. The effect of these words is to shock the reader into thinking about how the characters feel and to look at both sides of the story. The main use of the language in this chapter is to make the reader empathise with both characters and make up their minds as to the morals of each. In conclusion, the reader begins by being shocked by, and scared of, the monster. However, later on in the story they realise that the behaviour of the monster in chapter 5 was mainly due to it reaching out for what it considered to be its father, in the same way that a child might do. In chapter 10 the monster is shown in quite a positive light, where the reader realises how human its emotions really are. But, by chapter 24, the monster has committed many horrible acts and this changes the readers opinion to a negative view until the monster explains his side of what happens, and as he finally ends his own life as a remorseful soul, the reader is made to pity him. This shows that the author has manipulated the reader's feelings throughout the book, to change the way we see the monster. ?? ?? ?? ?? Rebecca Rowe ...read more.

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