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Frankenstein Look at the significance of chapter 5 of Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' to the novel as a whole. Analyse the relevance and effect of Shelley's use of language to describe setting and character and what it shows about historical and social infl

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Introduction

Look at the significance of chapter 5 of Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' to the novel as a whole. Analyse the relevance and effect of Shelley's use of language to describe setting and character and what it shows about historical and social influences. Section 1 Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein (or The Modern Prometheus) in 1816. She originally thought up the idea when staying with Lord Byron, he was also an author, and he challenged all his guests to a storywriting competition. The novel is about a scientist who, insistent on discovering the secret to creating life, sets out to do so. Using a heap of dead and decaying body parts, he makes himself a creature with his ex-professor's brain, and uses the power of lightening to bring it to life. Dr Frankenstein did not however, foresee the consequences of playing God. Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin was born on August 30th 1797, her mother Mary Wollstonecraft, who was an accomplished writer herself, died giving birth. She ran away in her teens, with Percy Bysshe Shelley, a dashing young poet. After their relationship underwent many strains, Percy's pregnant wife Harriet drowned herself in London in 1816, and weeks later, Mary and Percy married. ...read more.

Middle

He runs out of his house when the monster wakes him up with a gruesome smile, and returns the next day to find the monster gone. This chapter is what decides the fate of Victor Frankenstein from then on. Weakened and shocked at his monstrous creation, he comes down with nervous fever, and his long lost friend Henry Clerval, looks after him for several months. Once Victor has recovered Henry gives him a letter from Elizabeth. From this chapter onwards, Victor has turned from an obsessed scientist, frantic on discovering the secret of life, to a remorseful, weak victim of the horror he created. After a build up of growing insanity, the monster continuously haunts his life, and he can never escape it. Section 4 Victor's character changes very suddenly in chapter 5, where once he was a borderline madman, he became a weak, fragile person who had endless remorse over his awesome lack of sense during his isolated period. For the whole of the novel up to this chapter he is seen as the "mad scientist" who has no emotions, and is only spurred on by his work, this is true to a certain extent, he forgoes all contact with his family, and care for his own health, just to pore over his beautiful creation. ...read more.

Conclusion

Section 7 - Conclusion Chapter 5 is the most significant chapter in the novel for many reasons. Firstly, it is the chapter that the monster is created in, which is ultimately the most important part of the novel. The creation of the monster is what leads to the rest of Victor's life that is described in the novel, in his depression, illness, emotional weakness and his search for peace in finding the monster. Chapter 5 teaches us that during the 19th century, there was a lot of description in novels, and Frankenstein is no exception to the idea. In the 19th century writers also tried to write novels in a way that wouldn't just tell a story. Writers tried to use different styles and structures to make social comments, and include their own opinions. Mary Shelley's main aim in writing the story of Frankenstein was to rival the horror and fear inflicted by German ghost stories she had read when in Switzerland with Lord Byron. These were horrific, terrifying stories of death and murder, to incite fear in the minds of the reader. Shelley wanted to write a story even more gruesome than those of her fellow writers. To this day Frankenstein is still one of the scariest horror novels ever penned. ?? ?? ?? ?? Lizzi Ring 11NCS ...read more.

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