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Frankenstein's Monster: Monster or victim

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Introduction

Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Victim? In this essay I aim to come to a conclusion of whether Frankenstein's creature was a monster or a victim. Monster "a large frightening creature, a wicked or cruel person" Victim "a person or thing that suffers harm, from another or some adverse act or circumstance" These are the definitions of a monster and a victim, Frankenstein's creature fits both of these, by his sheer image, that is both terrifying and piteous, and the fact that he did not want to be created and brought to life. Stereotypically, monsters are big, ugly and generally frightening by either things they do or what they look like, whereas victims are usually weak, shy and rather pathetic. Normal divisions between these do not apply as the creature is both. The modern day monsters are people like Ian Huntley, Saddam Hussein or Osama Bin Laden, these are either murderers, dictators or terrorists, and the examples of modern day victims are the victims of 9/11, 7/11 and Jessica and Holly, which are all people who have died, either by acts or terror or rage. In the novel, many events that occur are directly related to things that happened to the author Mary Shelley, for example, Victors mother dies in child birth, as did Shelley's mother giving birth to her. ...read more.

Middle

I have no friend," this shows his loneliness in reaching his goal he will have to go through. He tells his sister how they were caught in ice and how he saw a man "of gigantic stature" being pulled by dogsled in the distance and how the morning after they found Victor Frankenstein. A few days later having recovered from the cold, Victor begins his tale. Victor's first narrative is that of his childhood, how he was brought up in a loving family, how he had an adopted sister and how he found his love for science by accident, where he finds the works of Cornelius Agrippa, Paracelsus and Albertus Magnus. This makes him hungry for knowledge and eventually leads him to the studies of science and alchemy. He observed an electrical storm, sparking his interest in electricity and its possible uses. He starts school work and goes to university at Ingolstadt where he begins to experiment with reanimating the dead. Pathetic fallacy is used when he brings the creature to life he says "It was on a dreary night in November" showing that even the weather was showing that something was up. ...read more.

Conclusion

He writes to his sister telling her to remember him fondly and to wish her family well. Walton decides to turn back. This is when Victor dies and the creature breaks into the cabin, telling his side of the story from where the terror began he decides that there is only one constellation, death, he decides to live the remainder of his life in the Arctic saying "I shall ascend my funeral pile triumphantly and exult in the agony of the torturing flames" with this statement he jumps overboard and disappears into the mist, this shows how he really does want it all to end. I believe that the creature really was just a victim of circumstance rather than a monster that was born it. He shows remorse after the killings that he has taken a life. The responsibility theme in the novel runs deep, starting with Victor running away from it when he creates the creature leaving it to die. I think that from my definitions of monsters and victims the creature is both, and I believe that Victor is the one to blame for the creature changing from a gentle innocent creature who wanted to help to a murderer because if he had showed it love and cared for it and not left it to its own devices things may have turned out differently. Rowland Hampshire 11A3 #1 ...read more.

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