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"Frankenstein's savage passions suggest that he, not the apparently more civilised creature, is the true monster" - discuss this statement with close reference to Chapter 10 in 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein'.

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Introduction

Monday 1st December Pre 1914 Prose Coursework: Frankenstein "Frankenstein's savage passions suggest that he, not the apparently more civilised creature, is the true monster" - discuss this statement with close reference to Chapter 10 in 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein'. Victor Frankenstein has consumed those he loves and the world around him by taking his beliefs and ideas to the extreme. He has created a living being with the furthest regions of his capability, but he has no intension of showing any positive feelings towards it. Victor was overwhelmingly consumed by his vision of creating and giving life, that he never predicted the future events of his actions. Although it is understandable to see that Frankenstein's sinful acts like digging up and experimenting on corpse as monstrosities, his intentions in connections to these acts were not of an evil nature but purely scientific. The dictionary quotes that the word monster means: 'fantastic imaginary beast, huge or misshapen person, animal or thing. Now none of the words in the definition could be classified as a characteristic of Dr. Frankenstein. If any part of Frankenstein is worthy of the title of monstrous then it should be his attitude to the creature he created. Could Dr. ...read more.

Middle

At this stage he is confused and petrified by what he has committed and his only natural instinct is to run away. I can partly see why he abandoned the creature, as if he himself could not accept the creature then there would be no possibility that the blindness of society would. People would inevitably be violent towards the creature and its obvious that Frankenstein did not want any part of it, as he to would be look upon in the same way as the creature, and this horrifies him. A good example of Frankenstein's guilt and horror are in chapter 10 when he states, "Cursed be the hands that formed you! You have made me wretched beyond expression." Here we see Frankenstein curse his hands as 'be the'. This is intriguing as it gives the sense of Frankenstein giving the view of another person's opinion of him. As if he wanted to curse himself then he would of stated so. This gives a sense of how deeply the idea of society finding out his horrendous crimes worries him, and that the guilt of making this creature is vigorously eating at his conscious. ...read more.

Conclusion

With this in mind the creator never harms Frankenstein. I believe this because to murder Frankenstein would be the quick, easy way. The monster wanted something more deeper, and painful to spite Frankenstein. This way the doctor would receive a taste of how he treats the creator. I believe monsters are what we make them, as Mary Shelley interpretations of fear are brought to flesh in the form of Frankenstein. Frankenstein is an example of what loneliness does to the human spirit as the creature's pain and audacity of abandonment drove it to inflict pain on others. Frankenstein's primal instinct simply warned him to run, and Mary Shelley plays on this idea that humanity creates life and abandons it will no motive. She does this, as humanity never bows down to the consequences of our actions. Relating back to the question I believe Frankenstein is the true monster as he is the one who is willing to give and discard life at his discretion. The creature he created just simply wanted companionship, but Frankenstein was to shellfish and unreasonable to offer it. I think he wanted to play God and he paid for the consequences, and I believe that Frankenstein only truly realised what a monster was, when he realises that he is actually one himself. Terry Cave English Coursework ...read more.

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