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Frankenstein - Who is the real monster?

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Introduction

Frankenstein Who is the real monster? The novel Frankenstein was written by Mary Shelley when she was only eighteen years old, after a nightmare she had. It was published on 1st January 1818 and became a great success. Mary Shelley used the style of gothic horror in this novel, introducing Frankenstein as perhaps the first science fiction book ever written in this genre. Almost two centuries later it has become a widely read classic novel, but also one of the most influential novels ever written. One of the influences on Mary Shelley when she wrote Frankenstein was the scientific experiments of the time. Scientists were researching the effects of electricity on dead animals and humans; they were striving to control powers of life and death. They had discovered that an electric current could galvanise the limbs, making them move. Not only does Dr. Frankenstein bring his creature to life by using an electrical current, but also Mary Shelley describes numerous storms, which include lightening, when the monster appears to Frankenstein at various points throughout the book. Frankenstein is a moral tale that deals with issues and ethics of medical and scientific progression and how far humans should go when tampering with nature. The story raises questions as to who should have final power over life and human nature; God or humans. ...read more.

Middle

It states that he is on a "lonesome road" and walks in " fear and dread" because "he knows a frightful fiend doth close behind him tread". It suggests that he has forced himself into a situation where he is alone and beyond the help of others because of his own actions. He stops outside an inn where he meets an old school friend "who on seeing him instantly sprung out". This meeting is fate as the friend is then murdered, towards the end of the book, by the monster. Previously Frankenstein has repeatedly referred to the creature as a 'miserable wretch'. He now goes further towards giving the creature an identity by claiming that he is his "enemy". Part of Frankenstein's rejection of his creature is that he does not even give it a name. Frankenstein is pushed to insanity by the fear of "his enemy". He is so consumed by fear and despair that he even implies that his friend should not have nursed him back to health, but have let him die so that he could get away from the creature and the dreadful consequences of his birth. This is shown when Frankenstein says, "firm in the hope he felt of my recovery, he did not doubt that, instead of doing harm, he performed the kindest action that he could towards them". ...read more.

Conclusion

He was given no opportunity to develop any kind of warmth or love because he did not experience it himself. Everywhere he went he was harmed in someway, whether it was mentally or physically. This is shown when he is describing his experiences to Frankenstein. "The whole village was roused; some fled, some attacked me, until, grievously bruised by stones and many other kinds of missile weapons, I escaped". In conclusion, I felt as a reader, most sympathy with the creature because he was brought into the world with no real sense of right or wrong, just as a child would be. However, he does not have the support of a family and is not shown love and support to enable him to grow in a way that society perceives as right. I think Mary Shelley is warning that meddling with science and things beyond our understanding could have consequences so bad that we cannot even imagine. Mary Shelley had terrible experiences of birth. Her mother died the day after she was born and she gave birth to several stillborn children. I think that the horror of these circumstances led her to express her feelings of grief and despair in the writing of this novel. I also think that there is an element of her blaming herself for these awful events in her own life. Mary Shelley combines these terrible events in her own life with the scientific experiments of the day to produce this tale of horror and despair. ...read more.

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