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George has many strong reasons for killing Lennie and does well by doing it. George and Lennie are best friends

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Introduction

George should have killed Lennie George has many strong reasons for killing Lennie and does well by doing it. George and Lennie are best friends. They are always together; they count on each other, especially Lennie on George. Many people argue that his reasons are not strong enough and should not have killed his best friend, but this is not quite true. Despite Lennie misbehaving several times, George puts up with everything he does and forgives him for all he does! There are limits and Lennie crosses them all! Firstly, many people think that George betrays Lennie by killing him, but Lennie would be killed in one way or another. The men on the ranch always follow Curley; otherwise he will go after them too and probably kill them - being the boss' son he will not be "sacked" from the ranch. In this case, Lennie, who kills Curley's wife, is the victim. Lennie's behaviour does not have anything to do with George; he has to choose his own path - being on Lennie's side as he always has been or go his own way without any problems with anyone. ...read more.

Middle

This is one of the problems both George and Lennie encounter because of Lennie and only Lennie. George always gets him out of trouble, always risking his own life and jobs. Can there be a better friend than that? True friends were hard to find in those times. John Steinbeck informs us in the beginning of chapter one that this story occurs in the middle of the Depression times in America. Friends that would take care of each other and support each other in the worst times would be hard to find! Besides, Lennie does not appreciate of the friend he has. Unfortunately he is not such a great friend, giving back the love, care and affection George has for him. What would happen if George would have got fed up of Lennie's ignorance and his childish, na�ve behaviour? For example, George tells Lennie many times not to talk to Curley's wife. George tells Lennie, "Well you keep away from her, 'cause she's a rat trap..." in page 54. Another example is when Lennie tells Curley's wife that "George says I ain't to have nothing to do with you - talk to you or nothing" in page 122. ...read more.

Conclusion

This explains that he is innocent and is mentally immature. Deep in his heart he wants no harm to anyone; but unfortunately he is not being able to control his forces. All the deaths occur because of his strength. Despite knowing he has a very weak self control, Lennie still wills to "pet" the soft fur or hair of the creatures that he eventually kills! It is favourable acts to kill people like Lennie, instead of letting them go, do as they want and harm the people around them. George thinks that if he kills Lennie, he would suffer less than if anyone else kills him- in this case Curley kills him. Both Lennie's and George's lives are in George's hands. There is a possibility that if George does not kill Lennie, both might get killed. He has no fault in what Lennie does, how he does, why he does it! George is a great friend to Lennie, always tells him what is right and what is wrong especially tolerates everything that he does. Regrettably Lennie does not comprehend this. Some drastic action has to be taken for all this to stop! George has tolerated too much. Lennie crosses all the limits of toleration. ...read more.

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