• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Great Expectations

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Great Expectations The novel, 'Great Expectations' by Charles Dickens, which was written in the Victorian times (19th Century-1800s) is about an orphan boy called Pip. Pip is an orphan who has to live with his sister Mrs Joe Gargery and her husband Joe Gargery. Pip is a poor boy that is forced to play with a rude rich young lady Estella who is adopted by Mrs Havisham. As Pip becomes older he grows up to become a blacksmith. Mrs Joe Gargery forces Pip to play with Estella in order to get money form Miss Havisham who is a rich women who inherited her money. Charles Dickens makes it clear that orphans were badly treated in the olden days. Orphans used to be beaten just like Oliver Twist when we had asked for more food. Children were badly treated because as it is told in Oliver Twist, children had to climb chimneys, a lot of times children used to get stuck in the chimneys and would die. However this did not affect anyone, people used to send more orphans up in to the chimneys to finish the job. The main characters in the novel are Pip, Magwitch, Mrs Joe Gargery and Joe Gargery. Magwitch Magwitch is an escaped convict who is a fearful man and seems quite rough and messy. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore, another theme of this novel is crime, 'I had begun by asking questions and I was going to rob Mrs Joe'. Pip thinks he is turning out to be a thief in the novel. This is because earlier on in the novel Pip had been asking Mrs Joe Gargery too many questions. Mrs Joe Gargery had told Pip ' All convicts start by asking lots of questions, just like you!'. Another Pip thinks that he is turning out to be a thief is because he ask he goes down the stairs to meet the convict and give him food a voice in his head screams 'STOP THIEF!'. Charles Dickens puts a convict in his novel, which relates to crime. The convict in this novel is Magwitch who has escaped. 'He turned me upside down and emptied my pocking. This also shows crime in the novel. This is because Magwitch sees Pip and threatens him to bring 'whittles', ' I'll cut your throat'. Magwitch threatens Pip and tells him that he is not alone in the graveyard. Magwitch tells him there is a boy with him who will kill him wherever he is he also tells him that the boy can also kill him when he will be in his warm cosy bed putting his blankets over his head to keep away form the danger. ...read more.

Conclusion

Charles Dickens creates a suspenseful atmosphere. This is because the weather is cloudy and misty anyone can come out of the fog and appear on the graveyard. To conclude I think that the first two chapter of the novel are engaging. They both build suspense. In the first chapter the Pip meets a convict called Magwitch who threatens hit to bring food and tools or else he would die. As Pip does do this in a way Magwitch and Pip become friends. Also suspense is created in the second chapter as Magwitch is caught and has to go back from where he had come from. The reader is left suspense by thinking if Magwitch and Pip would ever meet again. The novel does not have any relevance to day. This is because orphans are not treated the same as they were in the 1800s. Orphans do not have to climb chimneys and maybe even die. They are not like young workers nowadays. Orphans are given love and are treated like any other child in this world would be treated. They don't have to work at such a young age. Orphans are educated and loved by families who are willing to look after them. Sonia Nabi ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Discuss the role of Joe Gargery in Great Expectations.

    You know it to be No, Pip, and wherefore should I say it?' Miss Havisham glanced at him as if she understood what he really was, better than I had thought possible, seeing what he was there; and took up a little bag from the table beside her.

  2. Great Expectations:What does Pip have to learn in order to achieve some measure of ...

    to achieve some contentment, he has to listen to those who know best. This comes in the form of Herbert Pocket, who declares to Pip what Miss Havisham and Estella count for: 'I didn't care much for her. She's a tartar.'

  1. George Eliot criticised Dickens for 'encouraging the miserable fallacy that high morality and refined ...

    This is intensely touching, but one wonders how, following his tragic childhood he could emerge with such a poetic heart. As Eliot suggests, Dickens 'scarcely ever passes from the humorous and external to the emotional and tragic, without becoming...transcendent in his unreality'.10 Joe is poised between the extremes of a

  2. What does Pip have to learn in order to achieve some Measure of Contentment?

    'And what coarse hands he has! And what thick boots!' I had never thought of being ashamed of my hands before; but I began to consider them a very indifferent pair. Her contempt was so strong, that it became infectious, and I caught it. She won the game, and I dealt.

  1. Who Or What Do You Think Has The Most Influence on Pip's Development And ...

    Also, he tells Herbert of his affection for Estella, to which he is surprised to know that Herbert has already guessed he is in love with her. He does, however, try and warn Pip about her, "This may lead to miserable things."

  2. Representation of Women in 'Great Expectations’ by Charles Dickens and ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ ...

    from the fact that the North and South's views on slavery diverged. This loss for the South left feelings of bitterness among them. This was also a period of economic hardship after the stock market crash. The wealth in the south mainly came from plantations worked by black slaves.

  1. Benjamin Franklin in his Autobiography

    The physical abuse Pip endures here, so early in his childhood, also foreshadows the misery and pain he will later encounter among the upper classes. Moreover, closing the scene with "my ablutions were completed" (53) presents a resemblance between the simple bath and a ritual cleansing.

  2. Great Expectations - Show how the author Charles Dickens enables the reader to contribute ...

    The novel Great Expectations is based on 3 parts. It is very lengthy novel. The reason for it being long is that the book was not published all at once. Each part of the novel had to be very attractive on its own to make reader read and end in

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work