• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Great Expectations

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Great Expectations Charles Dickens, ( Born 7th February 1812, Died 9th June 1870 ) was a very successful novelist during the Victorian period, ( 19th Century ). He wrote some famous novels such as "A Christmas Carol " "Oliver Twist", and "Great Expectations" which I will be studying. Usually in such novels he would relate to and address social issues such as crime, punishment and moral issues. He wanted to give his readers an insight into the 19th century. In the opening Chapter of "Great Expectations" Charles Dickens employs a variety of techniques in order to hook the reader making them want to buy the next chapter in their weekly newspaper. He creates a strong vivid image of each character. I will be looking at how Dickens engages and sustains the interest of the reader in Chapters 1 and 30 of Great Expectations. The first chapter introduces us to the character "Pip" rather than it being third person, from a neutral point of view, it's first person, from the narrators perspective, but Pip is the narrator, this is to emphasise the situations Pip is in throughout the novel, to make the reader feel sorry for Pip. The opening paragraph straight away sets the tone about Pip, mainly to give us a strong impression of him from an early stags, once again making the reader sympathise with him. The opening page begins to give us a picture of Pip, straight away Pip says " My Fathers name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Phillip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. ...read more.

Middle

The scene that immediately follows the graveyard is that of the marshes. The fact that they are described as a long black horizontal line, with the sky being a row of angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed. This gives the reader a sense of the total desolation of the place - black, cold and damp. The mention of the graveyard in such detail and the cold and damp weather setting suggests the total feeling of isolation that Pip must have felt. Not only his feeling of isolation but also the suggestion that the churchyard scene so isolated in its own location. With the mention of a low church wall along with the undergrowth and the tombstones and then further on the marshes. Dickens concentrates totally on the churchyard and marsh-land settings with no suggestion of any other buildings or people in sight, apart from the cattle mentioned in the distance. The use of the gothic genre sets a very scary and desolate scene early in the story, its darkness works well in trying to imagine the terror felt by Pip. Once he starts to ran away the reader can almost share his relief as this isolated place is pushed further away from him. Pip thinks he is alone in the church yard, looking at the graves of his parents and family. The setting is very cold and bleak with a strong sense of sadness and desolation. ...read more.

Conclusion

This differs from the fear Pip felt when he first met the convict Pip has resentment for him and initially thinks he is mad. After the convict tells Pip and the money he is filled with abhorrence, dread and repugnance for hi,. Pip can't stand him, the closeness of the convict makes his blood run cold. Think Pip should have been a little more appreciative of all that the convict had suffered in order to give him wealth and status. I could understand the "initial shock" of the news but after that Pip should have considered that, if not for the convict, he would not be in the position he is in now. Dickens' message about social class indicates to he that everyone has the potential to make something of themselves, weather they are rich or poor, advantaged or disadvantaged. If people work hard dedication to a particular goal it can be achieved. This is illustrated by the convicts dedicated efforts to earn money in order to make life better for Pip. Also Pips ability to learn and improve his life. Pip started out very poor orphaned and through a chance meeting with a strange man his life would change for the better. Dickens was such a good person to write about social class because he saw the poor and disadvantaged as a daily basis. He could compare it to his own situation as he was educated and mixed with there more well off as well as mixing with the poor. He saw all of the injustices that the social class system brought about. Chris Powell 11F ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Great expectation

    Dickens probably used this technique of contrasting moods to help bring about this feeling of abnormality to Miss Havisham, without having to use a simple, easy sentence to understand sentence. Additionally, When Pip leaves to go London most of his close friends and relatives are "sobbing with tears".

  2. Charles Dickens Great Expectations Moral and Social Issues

    It is also the place where the escaped convicts are found fighting each other. Later on the novel, Pip falls into Orlick's trap and is about to be killed out on the marshes, but Herbert saves him. The mist symbolises the fact that nothing is what it seems.

  1. An exploration of the ways in which issues of class and status are presented ...

    her servants take advantage of them by ordering to much food and selling the leftovers on, and above all, are title-less. They are just as useless, self-important and indulgent as the aristocracy; yet do not have a title that allows them a living and perhaps even respectability in this class obsessed society.

  2. The opening of Great Expectations could be seen as your average opening to a ...

    A man with no hat, and with broken shoes, and with an old rag tied around his head. A man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in mud, and lamed by stones, and cut by flints, and stung by nettles, and torn by briars; who limped, and shivered,

  1. Dickens employs a rich variety of settings and characters to embody the continual struggle ...

    the fact that Pip first meets Magwitch here, and is the first scene in which we see Pip introduced. As the novel advances it comes to the reader's attention that Pip practically becomes part of the marshes "Ours was the marsh country" as Pip always seems to come back to

  2. Great Expectations:What does Pip have to learn in order to achieve some measure of ...

    But I loved Joe-perhaps for no better reason in those early days than because the dear fellow let me love him-and, as to him, my inner self was not so easily composed.'

  1. What does Pip have to learn in order to achieve some Measure of Contentment?

    that Joe has a psychological or behavioural flaw or weakness: he is timid and shy. Despite this, Pip looks to Joe as a hero, someone that can save him from his violent sister, and Pip takes on the family, moral values his life at the forge represents.

  2. How successful are Pip and Holden as fictitious narrators?

    In the case of Pip, he is remembering great reels of speech from when he was a very young boy and this of course makes slightly less believable as unless you had an extraordinary memory you would not be able to remember what people had said to you at the time word for word.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work