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Great Expectations

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Introduction

Great Expectations Charles Dickens, ( Born 7th February 1812, Died 9th June 1870 ) was a very successful novelist during the Victorian period, ( 19th Century ). He wrote some famous novels such as "A Christmas Carol " "Oliver Twist", and "Great Expectations" which I will be studying. Usually in such novels he would relate to and address social issues such as crime, punishment and moral issues. He wanted to give his readers an insight into the 19th century. In the opening Chapter of "Great Expectations" Charles Dickens employs a variety of techniques in order to hook the reader making them want to buy the next chapter in their weekly newspaper. He creates a strong vivid image of each character. I will be looking at how Dickens engages and sustains the interest of the reader in Chapters 1 and 30 of Great Expectations. The first chapter introduces us to the character "Pip" rather than it being third person, from a neutral point of view, it's first person, from the narrators perspective, but Pip is the narrator, this is to emphasise the situations Pip is in throughout the novel, to make the reader feel sorry for Pip. The opening paragraph straight away sets the tone about Pip, mainly to give us a strong impression of him from an early stags, once again making the reader sympathise with him. The opening page begins to give us a picture of Pip, straight away Pip says " My Fathers name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Phillip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. ...read more.

Middle

The scene that immediately follows the graveyard is that of the marshes. The fact that they are described as a long black horizontal line, with the sky being a row of angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed. This gives the reader a sense of the total desolation of the place - black, cold and damp. The mention of the graveyard in such detail and the cold and damp weather setting suggests the total feeling of isolation that Pip must have felt. Not only his feeling of isolation but also the suggestion that the churchyard scene so isolated in its own location. With the mention of a low church wall along with the undergrowth and the tombstones and then further on the marshes. Dickens concentrates totally on the churchyard and marsh-land settings with no suggestion of any other buildings or people in sight, apart from the cattle mentioned in the distance. The use of the gothic genre sets a very scary and desolate scene early in the story, its darkness works well in trying to imagine the terror felt by Pip. Once he starts to ran away the reader can almost share his relief as this isolated place is pushed further away from him. Pip thinks he is alone in the church yard, looking at the graves of his parents and family. The setting is very cold and bleak with a strong sense of sadness and desolation. ...read more.

Conclusion

This differs from the fear Pip felt when he first met the convict Pip has resentment for him and initially thinks he is mad. After the convict tells Pip and the money he is filled with abhorrence, dread and repugnance for hi,. Pip can't stand him, the closeness of the convict makes his blood run cold. Think Pip should have been a little more appreciative of all that the convict had suffered in order to give him wealth and status. I could understand the "initial shock" of the news but after that Pip should have considered that, if not for the convict, he would not be in the position he is in now. Dickens' message about social class indicates to he that everyone has the potential to make something of themselves, weather they are rich or poor, advantaged or disadvantaged. If people work hard dedication to a particular goal it can be achieved. This is illustrated by the convicts dedicated efforts to earn money in order to make life better for Pip. Also Pips ability to learn and improve his life. Pip started out very poor orphaned and through a chance meeting with a strange man his life would change for the better. Dickens was such a good person to write about social class because he saw the poor and disadvantaged as a daily basis. He could compare it to his own situation as he was educated and mixed with there more well off as well as mixing with the poor. He saw all of the injustices that the social class system brought about. Chris Powell 11F ...read more.

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