• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Great Expectations

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Great Expectations" Charles Dickens In this essay I shall be trying to determine how Charles Dickens creates a world of violence and humour in the first four chapters of "Great Expectations." "Great Expectations" was written by Charles Dickens in 1860, it was finally published in 1861, having first been serialised in newspapers. The novel is about a boy named Philip who became known as Pip. He dreams of becoming a gentleman and he becomes one. Throughout the book Pip grows up from being a shallow less boy, to a man of full depth of character. The book is written as a first person narrative. Dickens audience followed his development in weekly episodes by reading the newspapers. The weekly serialisation of 'Dickens' book gave him a regular audience. Throughout 'Great Expectations' 'Dickens' explores such themes as social class, justice, hierarchy, truthfulness and the truth of love. Many people today still enjoy reading "Great Expectations" because they like to compare their lifestyles today with those described in the book. During the book Pip has the desire to become a gentleman, this compares to having a good job in today's lifestyle. In the first four chapters of "Great Expectations" Dickens creates a world of violence and humour. ...read more.

Middle

The second chapter starts with Pip worrying about how long his sister Mrs Joe is going to be until she gets back from looking for him. "Has she been long?" This shows that Pip is anxious because he is scared of what his sister will do to him. He is also scared of the "tickler" as Joe explains that she is going to use her "painful - end of wax." At this point Pip cannot hide his fear "I twisted the only button on my waistcoat round and round in great depression at the fire." When Mrs Joe comes back from looking for Pip, she asks where he has been "Where have you been all day, you monkey?" By using the word 'Monkey' she implies a sense of worry because Pip was orphaned at birth and Mrs Joe has looked after Pip ever since he was born. However she does show a sign of violence, not psychically but in her speech and body language. "The slicing and the buttering of the bread." Implies that her body language is violent because she is slicing the bread vigorously During this chapter Dickens manages to use humour to involve the reader and to keep them interested. ...read more.

Conclusion

Humour also occurs when Mrs Joe fetches some brandy, that Pip had stolen and had filled the bottle up with tar, for Mr Pumblecook. When Mr Pumblecook starts to drink the so-called brandy he chokes and coughs. "Turning around...in a spasmodic whooping - cough dance... violently plunging... making hideous faces. Pips conscience is all over the place and he is extremely worried about what Mrs Joe will say. At this point Pip runs for the door. "I released the leg of the table, and ran for my life." In conclusion I believe that, Dickens has successfully written the book "great Expectations" using violence and humour effectively. He does this very well in the first four chapters by creating a great setting, atmosphere with good balanced chapters well, which the reader can relate to. By writing the novel in diary/autobiography format "Dickens" creates great tension and feel to each chapter, he can also describe scenes and characters well. He involves Pip during the book, which adds personal violence and humour through his way to becoming a gentleman. "Great Expectations" is an interesting novel that shows life as it was in those days. Although it was hard to understand, the more I studied it I felt that opened up a whole new self-interpretation to the book. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. In this essay, my intent will be to compare two film adaptations of the ...

    The convict is gaining up to Pip very rapidly, as he has fallen in between two graves. When Pip does see Magwitch the establishing, close-up shot, of Magwitch's face looking down on Pip shows his power. It shows the amount of power Magwitch has over Pip, and from the hoarse

  2. Great Expectations

    Charles Dickens not only analyses the criminal psychology, but also that of the little pieces that compound both legal and penal system. In the novel, Mr. Jaggers is the representative figure of the lawyer of the time. His office is located in Little Britain, the street where lawyers had their offices, near the Old Bailey (criminal courts)

  1. How does Dickens use characters in Volume One to present the themes of 'Great ...

    Dickens' use of the words: uncared for, abandoned, unloved, rotting and dusty to describe Satis house also signify Miss Havisham and the state of her decaying mind. She feels trapped and unable to get out, signified by the bars on the boarded windows.

  2. Analysing and explaining Charles Dickens' Great Expectations; Chapter 1.

    captured by the alarming chaser which we still haven't seen yet, who could now to anything to poor injured pip. The music suddenly stops dead at this point at exactly the same time as Pip fall to the floor, showing that all the energy that pip had to run has

  1. Great Expectations

    A key emotion that deepens is illustrated. On Pip taking a last walk on the marshes, he dismisses the memory of the convict-thinking that he will never see him again, after all these years. He already starts acting like a snob, planning generous disdain towards the villagers.

  2. Show how Dickens introduces the themes of crime, punishment and guilt in the early ...

    When we see this convict in these poor conditions we pity him, we feel sorry for the fact that he is suffering badly. In the last paragraph Pip talks about lines he sees when looking back to the convict. He imagines these lines to be like a prison cell, and

  1. In the light of your reading of "Great Expectations", what do you feel Dickens ...

    You never had the chance before you came here and see how improved you are!"

  2. Benjamin Franklin in his Autobiography

    and consequently, destroys the idealism that has directed Pip to this point of the novel. Unlike previous examples, this incident did not require a helping hand from the upper class for Pip to suffer pain and misery. This time, it is Pip's own rise in social standing and the unalterable

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work