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Great Expectations

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Introduction

Introduction Great Expectations is a novel written by Charles Dickens. From this novel I am going to compare chapter one with chapter thirty-nine. I am going to include how the characters of pip and the convict change drastically from chapter one to chapter thirty-nine and also the setting from both chapters. I am also going to include the historical context to see how it changes throughout both chapters. The setting in chapter one The setting in chapter one is like a ghost story. "Ours was the marsh country" (P1). The word marsh suggests that there is a lot of fog and mist. This makes it spooky. It also shows that pip may be frightened as he has come here for the first time; he may be perplexed with all the fog and the mist and have a smear in his mind and not know what is happening to him or around him. As a sharp writer Charles Dickens has used a narrative hook to draw the reader's attention. "...memorable raw afternoon towards evening" The word memorable tells the reader that something big is going to happen as well as it being a time to remember. The word raw suggests that it is extremely cold and as it is going towards evening and starting to get dark this could mean something magical or ghostly might happen. "Bleak place", the word bleak makes the place sound very dull and lifeless. Maybe if you went there it would make you feel unhappy and negative. This place also sounds as though nobody really likes to go there or care for it. "Overgrown with nettles was the churchyard". This may make the reader feel as though nobody goes their often. It also may start to make the reader ask questions such as why doesn't anybody go there? Are they afraid? Do scary things happen? The word nettles may tell you that pip might get stung. ...read more.

Middle

He may read a lot as he may not have anything else to do as he now lives alone and may feel extremely lonely. "I was alone, and had a dull sense of being alone." This is the same as chapter one when he was all alone in the churchyard. He is also missing his friend. "I sadly missed the cheerful face and ready response of my friend" This tells you that he doesn't see his friend much anymore. But this is different to chapter one as he did not have no friend at all. Pip has also grown up with a lot of imagination. "I thought, raising my eyes to them as they rocked, that I might have fancied myself in a storm beaten light house." This may tell the reader that he is very creative and reads a lot of imaginative boos and gets his imagination from their. "What nervous folly made me start, and awfully connect it with the footstep of my dead sister, matters not." This shows that even though Pip is now a lot older mature he still feels frightened likewise to chapter one when he was extremely afraid. In chapter one Pip met the convict, but many years on he doesn't remember his face. "I had seen a face that was strange to me, looking up with and incomprehensible air of being touched and pleased by the sight of me." This convict in this chapter is pleased by the sight of Pip but it was the opposite in chapter one when the convict wasn't very pleased to see him. Even thought Pip is now a grown man he still is very polite. "Pray, what is your business?" I asked him." This is also the same as chapter one when he was polite when speaking. But in chapter one the convict was the one with the power, but not anymore Pip is now the one with the power. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is different to the first chapter as then he was very mean to Pip and did not like him at all. "I'll speak in half a minute. Give me half a minute, please" This would tell the reader that he is desperate to talk to Pip. He also says "please" this shows that he has now learnt his manners. You also start to warm towards the convict in this chapter. "He grasped them heartily, raised them to his lips, kissed them, and still helped them." The convict is showing affection again. It also makes you feel sorry for him because of the way Pip talks to him and treats him. But he still talks to Pip as though he is his long lost son. "...noble, my boy" He is proud of Pip. "...his eyes were full of tears." This could me he is either upset or so full of joy and proud of Pip that he has become a gentlemen and he is so happy to see him. This would make to reader warm towards the convict. The historical context in chapter one... Historical context is mentioned throughout chapter one. "For their days were long before the days of photograph". This would give the reader a clue that it was set in the late 1800s as they were no photographs then. There was also "universal struggle" This means life was a struggle for poor people. It also tells us that it was set in Victorian times by the way they speak. "Sir" people would not normally say this. "Pint out the place" Nobody would speak like this now. Also in them days people were hung for their crimes "...gibber" Nobody would get hung now. The historical context in chapter thirty-nine... Mainly the historical context in this chapter is used in speech such as when Pip says "there is nothing the matter?" In the modern society we would no speak like that. He also says at one time. "Pray, what is your business?" ...read more.

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