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Great Expectations - 2D Characters

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Introduction

"Dickens characters are two-dimensional. We do not catch a glimpse of their inner life and there seems to be no change or development in them during the course of the novel". To what extent is this true of the characters in Great Expectations? Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens, is told through the eyes of Pip (Phillip Pirrip) - a young orphan living with his sister and husband in the marshes of Kent. Great Expectations is set in early Victorian England, a time when social changes were becoming prominent in society and these changes affected Pip. Within these social changes there are three incidents which show his inner life and personality, which will be later analyzed in the essay. The statement, "Dickens characters are two-dimensional. We do not catch a glimpse of their inner life and there seems to be no change or development in them during the course of the novel", is not true in the characters of Great Expectations. ...read more.

Middle

I knew to be wrong".2 Hence showing to us more that Pip is honest and does not want to offend family and friends. Furthermore, "there seems to be no change in them (characters) in the novel" is also a false statement. This can be seen by looking at Pip, who appears eccentric and is tagged with extreme names, such as Pip Pirrip, and mannerisms so that, in the main they appear to become more like caricatures than real people.3 What's more is that Pip progresses from a child living on the marshes of Kent with his sister and her husband, the blacksmith, to a gentleman who begins to act as he thinks a gentleman should act which consequently results in treating Joe, the blacksmith and Biddy snobbishly and uncaringly. Additionally, Pip is a very generous and sympathetic young man, which can be seen in numerous acts of kindness throughout the three volumes in Great Expectations. The fundamental proof to prove the statement 'Dickens characters are two dimensional ... ...read more.

Conclusion

This incident shows how Pip has developed as a character because of the fact that from the very first moment he saw Estella he fell in love, but after an unpleasant encounter with Drummle at the inn, he travels to Satis house to see Miss Havisham and her daughter, Estella one more time. Altogether, "Dickens characters are two dimensional. We do not catch a glimpse of their inner life and there seems to be no change or development in them during the course of the novel", is a false statement. By looking at the narrator and character Pip, as a young boy at the beginning of the novel, to Pip a young gentleman living in the prosperity of London, it proves that the characters are not two dimensional and they do develop during the course of Great Expectations. WORD COUNT: 798 WORDS 1 http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/greatexx/canalysis.html 11/27/2005 2 Great Expectations, Charles Dickens pg 41 12/1/2005 3 Peter Cook (21st November 2005), Intro Great Expectations, 11/27/2005 4 http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/greatex/canalysis.html 11/27/2005 5 Great Expectations, Charles Dickens page 222 12/1/2005 6 http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/greatexy/canalysis.html 11/29/2005 1 ...read more.

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