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Great Expectations

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Introduction

Great Expectations Great Expectations is a play written by the famous novelist Charles Dickens in the mid 1800's. Great expectations is set in the early Victorian times this was a time were great social changes took place. This was when there were big differences between the rich and the poor and if you did not have money, you were not treated the same way as if you did. Charles Dickens tried to educate the poor about the differences in society and the divides between rich and poor through his novel. Books in those days were accounted as luxuries and only the rich had luxuries as they could afford them, therefore the poor people never got to read the books that were published. Charles Dickens on the other hand wrote his whole novel in parts, these were then published in a weekly magazine called "All The Year Round" Dickens may have done this so that both the rich and the poor could read his novel. Great expectations is all about a little poor orphan called Pip and how his life is changed from being poor to rich, throughout the play we see Pip change as in the middle of the play he becomes a person of great expectations as a unnamed benefactor (Abel Magwitch) ...read more.

Middle

Joe Gargery is Pips brother in law and is a very kind and honest person. Joe is a blacksmith with no social class or manners and very less money but he still is very nice, suffers in silence, and acts for his loved ones. Joe always stands by Pip we know this by when he comes late home after being threatened by Magwitch; Joe quickly tells him to hide behind the door as Mrs Joe is looking for him with the tickler (a stick which both Joe and Pip were hit with) also Joe and Pip were like friends as they both used to talk to each other about Mrs Joe and how strict she was we also know this by the way they both used to have a competition whilst eating their buttered loaf of bread. Joe is also a victim of Mrs Joe as he is beaten and punished for doing things. Joe makes the opening chapters effective as he is funny, because he is a grown man and still is beaten by his wife. Mrs Joe is Pip's sister who is looking after him after his mother and father have died. She is extremely cruel and strict we know this by because she hits both Pip her brother and Joe her husband a lot, furthermore Mrs Joe does not let both Joe and Pip talk whilst they eat and there are restricted to ask questions or have a general conversations in her presence. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another example of this is when the guards come to get the handcuffs fixed for the convicts and when both Joe and Pip help to go along and find them he strong conscience is seen again as he thinks that everyone will find out that he helped Magwitch and stole food for him, thinking of Pip becomes extremely frightened. The theme of Social Class plays a main role in the novel as Dickens was trying to explain the social differences between the rich and the poor in the Victorian times. Furthermore Pip's realisation that wealth and class are less important than affection, loyalty, and inner worth. Pip achieves this realisation when he is finally able to understand that a person's social status is in no way connected to their real character In addition, the way that Pip changed class would have been very difficult for someone else but as he had the help of a benefactor, he was aided, from being low class person with no education, no money, and a basic home to a middle class rich person, with education and a gentleman I think that the first two chapters were effective way start to the book as it opened there was a lot of action and a build up of tension when Pip was getting threatened by Magwitch and was told to steal the food and the file. ?? ?? ?? ?? Great Expectations I ...read more.

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