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Great Expectations - Charles Dickens.

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Introduction

Great Expectations-Charles Dickens 'Great Expectations' narrator is first introduced to the reader not by character or background but by name. The name tells the reader details of his sensitive personality. Pip a simple name, it creates an image of an insignificant person who can easily be put aside and forgotten about. This young boy is portrayed as lonely and friendless because when we first meet him he is visiting the tombstones of his parents and the six stone tablets that tell a tale of his brothers. Pip formally introduces his sister as 'Mrs. Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith.' Such a formal introduction only indicates that Pip does not have a close relationship with the only living family member we know of. This young boy that knows nothing of a loving family or even a close relationship explains to the reader the way his active imagination answers the questions he dare not ask of his sister, 'What were our parents like?' The narrator then pans over the background surroundings like a camera man explaining the landscape in its bleakness, and ...'raw afternoon...'. He then begins to focus in on the tombstones of his parents and then almost zooms out to the '...dark flat wilderness' going on about the churchyard then further out beyond it to the '...dykes and mounds and gates...'. We learn of the marshes near a river. Then the wind rushing past and then, is focuses on Pip '...the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip.' ...read more.

Middle

Such a comment can only mean that Miss Havisham has buried feelings about the male sex. When you read the text you can see that everything has stopped at a certain time even she has stopped dressing at a certain time. She has bridal flowers in her hair and is wearing a bridal dress which once I'm sure was fitted to perfection on her young body. Everything that was white is now yellow with age, Miss Havisham has not wished to clean any of her personal belongings, she has kept everything in exact positions. In the text later when she is talking to Estella she picks up a broche and places it against her, when she has finished she puts it back in the exact same place. This demonstrates her need for familiarity in her life and the strong want to keep everything in the same place as though it will keep time in that same place. Sadly we all know that time moves on and soon Pip leaves and his visits become regular until Miss Havisham helps him to become a blacksmiths assistant and he begins to work with his sisters husband Mr. Joe Gargery the blacksmith. Pip grows up as a blacksmiths assistant yet he had always truly wanted to be a 'gentleman'. He is stunned when he receives a copious amount of money from an unknown source. Pip quickly jumps to the assumption that his new found wealth had been provided by Miss Havisham. He goes to thank her and she carries on leading him down the wrong belief that this wealthy benefactor is her. ...read more.

Conclusion

like love and I think she was scared of herself because she did not know how top react to situations due to the lack of information she was granted by Miss Havisham when she was young and innocent. Estella was a strong and proud character but she needed to be loved by someone that was not using her to succeed where they did not (Miss Havisham) or to just use her (Drummle). Although this novel was written more than 150 years ago its themes of love, snobbery, suffering and redemption are still relevant today and will still be relevant in another 150 years. I think that Charles Dickens was not ahead of his time when he wrote this, I feel he was at a point in his life were he had realised '...the identity of things..' for himself. He knew like anyone who reads this book that these characters are not one person they represent so much more than that, society as a whole. Their suffering can be read into and developed more to explain difficulties we, the audience, go through today during our life. I can guarantee you that each and every character and their story will relate to another person in this world today and a person in the future too. Charles Dickens wrote this novel to help us understand what he did. This book is about life and death and all the pieces in between. A griping novel and a book which has one page to relate to a different part of life or a different life all together. English Alison Verona Page 1 of 5 ...read more.

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