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'Great Expectations' Comment on Dickens' use of setting focusing on the opening graveyard scene and the scenes with Miss Havisham set in the Satis house.

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Introduction

Lindsay Venables Mr Selby GCSE Coursework 'Great Expectations' Comment on Dickens' use of setting focusing on the opening graveyard scene and the scenes with Miss Havisham set in the Satis house As a skilled writer Dickens has chosen a perfect setting in which corresponds to the involvement of his characters. The dark isolated graveyard associates with death, and provides a backdrop that is very similar to the appearance of a criminal, in the society in Dickens' time. Dickens describes the marshes as being a dark, flat wilderness. This creates the opportunity to become lost and isolated, it emphasises the danger for someone who is alone, such as Pip. Pip is far from the safety of the town and from the higher class in society, therefore he is very vunerable to criminality. The society in Dickens' time was very different to the society now, it was potrayed in the places he used, such as the town. This was to show the higher classed side of society, where all people who were nice, honest and normal lived. The marshes were used because of its vast emptiness and the danger involved in being out there. ...read more.

Middle

When Magwitch turns Pip upside down, it's like Pips life being turned around. From being a well brought up boy to a criminal. Dickens wrote this to show the idea of the change in Pip's behaviour and manner towards criminality. The appearance of Magwitch, cut and stung by nettles, scares Pip, because he doesn't want to become like him and look like that. Pip is about to undergo a disturbing experience as he enters Miss Havisham's garden, as it is overgrown ang tangled with weeds. Dickens describes it like this to show that it hasn't been cared for and there is no love, like the appearance of Miss Havisham. The courtyard is described as being lifeless and desolate; there are no pigeons, no horses and no pigs. This gives the idea that the place is abandoned and empty. The noise of the wind is compared to the noise of the wind in the rigging of a ship. This shows how quiet and scary the atmosphere was and how lonely Pip must have felt. All the surrounding walls are very high, this gives Pip the feeling that he is trapped and there is no way out. ...read more.

Conclusion

Even though the bridal flowers in her hair had withered with the dress and the bride. Nothings changed in Miss Havisham's room, like the positioning of her half packed trunks, her prayer book and the time on her clocks, this also shows that she doesn't want to change, and she wants things to stay the same. When Pip is in the Satis house, Estella says to him, 'that whoever has this house could want nothing else'. This means that if you do own the house it is enough, which is what Satis means. You would also have wealth, education, refinement and position. In Dickens' view on society in the Victorian times, this is enough for someone in the upper class, they do not need love, care and compassion. My observations, from how society was for Dickens in the Victorian times to how society is now, are very different. In Dickens' time there were classes and different groups and divides. He shows this by having criminals living on the marshes in the harsh, wild, unpleasant conditions. He has the upper class people living in the town in well-established houses such as the Satis house. Dickens has created a perfect metaphoric society that corresponds to the physical society he lives in and the atmosphere and living conditions are right for that period of time. ...read more.

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