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Great Expectations. Discuss How Dickens establishes the identity of young Pip at the start of the Novel

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Introduction

Discuss How Dickens establishes the identity of young Pip at the start of the Novel Great Expectations is a novel written by Charles Dickens during 1860-61. Similar to the traditional Bildungsroman this story presents the life of the protagonist (in this case Pip) through the eyes of older Pip. Some describe it as a semi-autobiographical novel. This novel guides us through a poor orphan boy's life. We see how experience transforms the innocence of the child and develops new ideas and expectations for him.. Thanks to some unexpected encounters Pip finds himself growing from a blacksmith's apprentice to a London gentleman. This novel concerns the different emotions and experiences Pip encounters during his transformation and the development of his psychological and intellectual self. In the first chapter we can learn a lot about Pip's background and life. He is introduced to the reader as a crying boy, who is alone looking at his family's grave, imagining what his parents would look like. When the convict begins to handle him roughly and threateningly him he becomes 'dreadfully frightened' and clings onto the convict. He is shown to be helpless and dependent, a lot like a small young chararacter at the start of a bildungsroman. ...read more.

Middle

As Pip was carried in Mr Pumblechook's wagon constantly being asked difficult mathematical questions, he wonders 'what on earth I (Pip) was expected to play at' in the old strange lady's house. He gives the impression of being nervous and worried 'not at all at my ease'. And the first impression of the house doesn't improve things for Pip. The house was of 'old bricks', 'dismal' and bleak. The 'windows had been walled up ... rustily barred'. The large brewery was all abandoned. The place was dead, it seems to be old and abandoned. It must have been hard for Pip as a boy to believe anyone could live in such a place. Pip would have been intimidated by the house and Miss Havisham even more looking at a place so grave, especially with the imagination he was shown by Dickens to have before. As Pip and Mr Pumblechook gets near the gate a 'young lady who was very pretty and seemed very proud' greets them in a disrespectful manner (because of their position in society). The young lady seems to have more power than a grown man. As the young lady leads Pip to Mr Havisham they have a conversation, The young lady treats him no better. ...read more.

Conclusion

They were treated like animals, people hated convicts. Almost every convict were executed even if there wasn't real evidence. In Great Expectations the convict is shown to be respectable and loyal. Pips convict voluntarily admitted on stealing the food and file to cover up for Pip, and after the long years he remembers Pip and pays him back handsomely. This is the exact opposite of Victorian views. Dickens ideas were easily portrayed in this autobiographical writing. This may have been the reason he chose to write in this style in the first place, in order to express his own ideas and feelings. Great Expectations charts a poor orphan boy developing into a rich London gentleman. We can see Dickens own ideas about the worl portrayed in the protagonist and his world which isn't that different from what Dickens world was like at the time. During the development Dickens made it easy for the readers to understand how experience and knowledge changes the mind and expectations of a innocent boy by letting him speak his thoughts and feelings. Through the use of devices such as setting, other characters and Pip's thoughts Dickens establishes Pip's young identity. This book is autobiographical. Dickens chose a sensible genre to write his book by and he successfully achieved his purposes of letting the readers understand the development of and boy and giving Pip his identity. ...read more.

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