• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Great Expectations. From my reading of the novel Great Expectations, I have found that Dickens creates an eerie sense of place In the 3 extracts that I have studied.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Great Expectations Introduction The novel 'Great Expectations' was written by Charles Dickens between 1860 - 1861. From my reading of the novel 'Great Expectations', I have found that Dickens creates an eerie sense of place In the 3 extracts that I have studied. In order to create this sense of place, Dickens uses a number of techniques, these techniques include violence and aggression, prison imagery, light and dark, death and decay and numerous typical writers techniques such as personification, alliteration, similes, repetition and metaphors. In this Essay I am going to explore the different techniques Dickens uses to create a sense of place. Cemetery Scene In the first extract I studied, the cemetery, we are bombarded with images of death. This is clearly illustrated in the repetition of 'dead and buried', this repeated phrase symbolises the extent of death in these times. The symbol of the tombstone and the knowledge that Pip's parents are dead all reinforce a sense of sinister expectation. The phrase 'low leaden line' is an example of alliteration, this shows it's dark and un-pleasant. When Pip is in the cemetery we are introduced to the big evil character in the shape of Magwitch, he says "hold your noise" , "keep still, you little devil, or I'll cut your throat" all this is examples of threat, violence and aggression, the direct speech creates tension. "A man with no hat, and broken shoes" shows that Magwitch is poor. ...read more.

Middle

This phrase is comical and the kind of thing that only a child would believe. Magwitch says "there's a young man hid with me" he says this to create a bit of threat towards Pip to show he has help if he needs it. "like a man whose legs were numbed and stiff" this phrase makes it sound as if he's old and crooked. "still hugging himself in both arms, and picking his way with his sore feet" this phrase shows he's a broken man inside although he's trying not to show it. "the sky was just a row of long angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed" this phrase suggests danger in the surroundings. " The man was limping on towards this latter, as if he were the pirate come to life, and come down, and going back to hook himself up again" this represents a child like imagination within Pip. In this first extract, the main way Dickens creates a sense of place is the use of violence and aggression, death and decay and many writers techniques. Miss Haversham's house In the second extract I studied, Miss Havershams house, we are being attacked with examples of darkness, and prison imagery. The quote "the great front entrance had two chains across it outside" this is Ironic as she choose's to lock herself away from the world where as Magwitch is forced to be locked up. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also reminds us about the cemetery scene. Mr Jaggers office In the third extract I studied, Mr Jaggers office, we are hit with and example of light and dark straight away in the opening line. "Mr. Jaggers's room was lighted by a skylight only" this tells us that there is not natural light, just like in Miss Havershams house. "most dismal place" this tells us that they are gloomy and un-pleasant conditions. We are now shown some personification in the shape of "houses looking as if they had twisted themselves to peep down at me throught it" this is personification because houses can't twist themselves to peep down at Pip. The quote "an old rusty pistol, a sword in a scabbard, several strange looking boxes and packages, and two dreadful casts on a shelf, of faces peculiarly swollen, and twitchy about the nose" is all quite un-nerving, eerie and sinister, they all symbolise death, violence and aggression. "like a coffin" is a simile and it reminds us of the cemetery scene. "backing up against the wall" tells us that they are being intimidated by Jaggers, it suggests some guilt within the clients. "that dusty perch for the blacks and flies to settle on" suggests it's un-clean. Conclusion In conclusion, In order to create a sense of place, Dickens uses a number of techniques, these techniques include violence and aggression, prison imagery, light and dark, death and decay and numerous typical writers techniques such as personification, alliteration, similes, repetition and metaphors. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Great expectation

    Moreover, the Satis house, which is introduced afterwards, is described as the "perfect reflection of Miss Havisham's living death: the once luxurious house has been allowed to decay around her". The courtyard outside of the house is described as "paved and clean, but grass was growing in every crevice".

  2. How does Charles Dickens hook the reader into reading Great Expectations?

    as they will be shocked to see that five members of the protagonist's family have passed away. Death was more common in Victorian times, so it is likely that they weren't bothered if someone had passed away. On the contrary if more individuals encountered death more individuals would understand the protagonist's struggle with sorrow.

  1. Examine how Dickens shoes that appearances can be deceptive in Great Expectations

    Therefore, the reader can only think what Pip thinks and see what Pip sees. This allows Dickens to portray his views on aspects such as being a gentleman through Pip. The early Pip is shown by Dickens to be a stereotypical Englishman, believing that one should aspire to be a

  2. Great Expectations Analysis

    Succeeding this is a detailed account of Havisham and her ominous surroundings. Dickens has employed long, complex sentences to add layers of effect. In addition to this, Havisham's ignominious condition is compounded by the repetition of the oxymoron 'once white, now yellow'.

  1. Charles Dickens's writing techniques in Great Expectations.

    Pip realizes that he is not meant to be with Estella, and that the false appearance of his expectations that he put out for himself were completely untrue. Before he left for London, he thought that it was going to be grand, wonderful, and illustrious.

  2. Free essay

    Great Expectations

    shackles he is a very menacing, dark and mysterious character because he appears behind Pip in a grave yard which is supposed to be secluded. He says "Hold your noise or I'll cut your throat", this tells us that he is a very vindictive and vicious man because he threatened

  1. Analysing and explaining Charles Dickens' Great Expectations; Chapter 1.

    happening which has to be slowed down to be understood and fully witnesses by the audience because its so vital to them perceiving the rest of the film. It also creates tension because slow motion creates an atmosphere of suspense and implies that something devastating and drastic is going to

  2. Great Expectations

    cold as death, and he had the head of the devil afore mentioned. " (372-3) Compeyson's appearance helped him in a case against him and Magwich. Compeyson said a very divulging quote to Magwich: "To judge from appearances, you're out of luck" (373) In the trial, this was very evident.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work