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Great Expectations hope that I have shown that the first, eight chapters show Pip's terror of everything but also his potential to succeed

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Introduction

Great Expectations Great Expectations was one of the most popular novels by Charles Dickens and perhaps the one that is most popular today. I would like to show how he created clear pictures of his characters and settings and make his themes obvious using skilful manipulation of language. At the beginning of the novel, Dickens describes some graves in a churchyard, and a boy, who is looking at the graves, named Phillip Pirrip but called Pip. His much older sister, Mrs Joe Gargery, wife of the blacksmith Joe Gargery, looks after Pip. The graves are those of Pip's family, his mother, Father and five brothers. Pip has never seen his mother or father but imagines what they looked like by the shape of their gravestones. He imagines his father as 'A square, stout, dark man with black curly hair,' and pictures his mother as 'Freckled and sickly.' Pip then looks at his five brothers tombstones and says to himself," They gave up trying to get a living exceedingly early in that universal struggle," Pip then goes on to say to himself, " ...read more.

Middle

The convict has told Pip that he must bring the 'wittles' and file to him at the graveyard the next day. That night Pip has nightmares about the young man. He doesn't want to sleep because he thinks that the young man will creep up on him and tear out his heart and liver. Joe sees himself as being an important member of the local community because he's the blacksmith. He gets bossed around by Mrs Joe but seems to be used to it. Pip explains how he feels almost sorry for Joe Gargery stating, "that she must have made Joe Gargery marry her by hand." He is suggesting that she is just as much of 'a force of nature' against Joe Gargery as she is to Pip. Joe Gargery's house is on the marsh, which is a damp, dreary, lonely place. The next point I would like to turn to is the effect Miss. Havisham had on Pip's life as a boy and a man. ...read more.

Conclusion

And what thick boots!" Later on Pip is outside in the courtyard, Pip realises that he doesn't like his coarse hands and thick boots, he also says that they had never troubled him before, but they troubled him now, 'as vulgar appendages.' This obviously means that Estella has had a big impact on him. Pip has started to look at himself as being 'not good enough,' he thinks to himself that he wished Joe had been rather more 'genteelly' brought up, and that I should have be so too. This is the start of the downfall of Pip's want for money and the high life. In a way Pip and Estella are great contrasts, because of Pips great expectations for the future and Estella's great expectations that have been forgotten, like her personality and emotion. Dickens brings us to beware of great expectations, but Pip doesn't learn this. I hope that I have shown that the first, eight chapters show Pip's terror of everything but also his potential to succeed. The rest of the novel is the story of how his potential is realised, not always happily for Pip- so in this sense the first eight chapters start the novel off. ...read more.

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