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Great expectations.In comparing Chapter's 1 and 39 the similarities in scene setting and character description

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Introduction

Great Expectations: A Comparison of Chapter 1 with Chapter 39. In comparing Chapter's 1 and 39 the similarities in scene setting and character description are used by the author to reinforce each other. This allows the reader to not only feel the time in which the book is set but gives the characters life. Pip is presented both as the narrator as well as protagonist. He is two characters in one presented initially as an innocent young boy. This first introduction to Pip draws the reader to question what will happen to him as an innocent and is in direct contrast to the mature adult in Chapter 39. The description of the landscape in the first chapter is extremely intense and is successful in creating an Erie sense about Pips surroundings. The language used prepares the reader and also instils strong images which enable the reader to see how Pip relates to his surroundings. The gibbet that Pip looks upon toward the end of the chapter mirrors the society of the time, the harsh judicial system and the ruthlessness of the upper-class, who decided the fate of convicts. This harshness is a characteristic of the landscape, especially the weather. The way this is described dramatically ' it was wretched weather, stormy and wet, stormy and wet, and mud, mud, mud' draws the reader into both the scene within which the book is set but also the nature of society at this time. ...read more.

Middle

This makes the reader grow to empathise with Magwhich even though he has behaved in the aggressive intimidating way described in the previous paragraph. This imprecise portrayal of the character does not persist in the same manner in chapter 39 as I believe Magwitch has finally achieved something worthwhile and also, almost to take a stab at society as status was so consequential in that era. If one had money then one would automatically have status, as people believed that they were better than average folk even though the wealth had not been worked for but inherited. In shaping Pip Magwitch has proved to society that anyone can be a gentleman. The fact that Pip came from a poor despondent background was inconsequential . In chapter 39 Magwitch says 'the blood horses of them colonists might fling up the dust over me as I was walking; what do I say? I says to myself, I'm making a better gentle man nor ever you'll be!' This shows us that he kept this in his mind while being looked down on throughout his many years in Australia. Magwhich is obviously one of the only savoury characters in the novel as he toiled and worked all his life so that Pip could be 'above work.' Another complete turn around between the chapters is the roll reversal, for example in Chapter 1 Magwitch is in complete control, whereas in Chapter 39 Magwitch calls Pip 'Sir' and 'Master'. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, between Chapters 1 and 39 the characters evolve and change into contradictions of their initial introduction. Their roles appear reversed with Pip the mature, rude and spiteful imitation of Magmitchs's character. The language used allows the reader to develop their understanding of the time and setting the characters live. It creates strong images which provide both a scene and a an emotional connection to the character. Between the two chapters this builds the intensity and drama to the revelation of Pip's true nature. Both characters identities have changed Magwitch from his initial portrayal to his true self and Pip to a wealthy upper class imitation of a gentleman whose innocence presented in the first chapter now replaced by arrogance. Dickens would seem to be 'taking a stab' at the class system in Victorian times and the effect that money had on individuals in society. By using the bleakness of the scene in Chapter 1 and the bright beacons an element of hope is subconsciously given to the reader. The emotional journey that Pip then undertakes feels a positive turn in his life. The changes in his character and the twists in the character of Magwitch 'the convict' reveals the true nature of an individual cannot be measured by his wealth or position. Dickens allows the reader to see that the strive to be a gentleman is very different to that of becoming a gentle-man and this is portrayed clearly in the character of Joe Gargery. ?? ?? ?? ?? Daniel McDonnell 11Postgate Great expectations course-work 06 1 ...read more.

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