• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Great Expectations is a novel written by the famous nineteenth writer Charles Dickens. In the following lines I am comparing two different film versions of Great Expectations, which my class have been watching.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Media Coursework Great Expectations is a novel written by the famous nineteenth writer Charles Dickens. In the following lines I am comparing two different film versions of Great Expectations, which my class have been watching. The first version is in black and white and is by David Lean. It was made in 1945 and the second version is in colour and was made by Tony Marchant in 1999 for the BBC. Before focusing on one particular scene, it would be quite appropriate to have a general comparative look at both movies. As far as the use of different techniques and devices is considered, both film makers have used all types of camera shots, For example Close up shots that may show emotions and high angle shots that may show characters in a higher position or having a higher status compared to one another. Similarly light and shadows have been used effectively to create suspense in both versions of the movie. ...read more.

Middle

In both versions, the film makers have used high angle shot of Estella from Pip's point of. This is actually to make her seem more powerful. When entering the gates, Marchant shoots it from Uncle Pumblecooke's view, looking through the gates gives one a sense of them standing behind the gates. However Lean enters the gates in a completely different way. As Pip walks through the gates, the camera zooms to a low angle shot of him looking at the clock that has stopped and then final focuses at the clock. Also, before entering the house, one could see the light coming from outside which suddenly turns darker as Pip and Estella enter the house. Lean's picturaisation of Estella leading Pip into Satis House is well planned as it gives the audience a part in the film. He uses the camera by following them in such a way that makes the audience follow with them. ...read more.

Conclusion

When meeting Miss Havisham, Lean makes the camera pan around her showing her emotions. However Marchant uses a long shot of her. I personally believe that the film made by David Lean is better than the one made by Tony Marchant. As I feel that Lean's version of the movie closely relates to the actual novel written by Charles Dickens, as Lean has included almost all the features that Dickens has written in the original story of the Great Expectations. Besides that, Lean has very skilfully used the film making techniques, which livens the story on the cinema screen. The cinematography, music and sound effects, set designs and camera work well relate to each other. Also, the selection of the artists has been done quite carefully. The element of curiosity as to what would happen next keeps the viewer's interest alive in the movie from beginning till end. All these feature of the movie make it an all time classic just as the greatest writer's original novel is. Urmila Thurairatnam 10S 1 Media Coursework ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Great Expectations: A Tale of Two Endings

    No, because until Pip sees her it is shown that he is mature enough to realize that his "poor dream" will never come true. The original ending shows Estella as slightly changed, but not changed enough to seem unrealistic (which is how the revised ending portrays her).

  2. How do David Lean and Julian Jarrold use film techniques to influence the viewers ...

    When in the graveyard, Jarrold interchanges between the direct views of Pip and the convict. It means that the viewer can be aware of exactly what the two characters are thinking and doing, for example, it is possible to see precisely how the convict finds Pip.

  1. Charles Dickens's writing techniques in Great Expectations.

    hide from you, even if I desired, that I do want something. Miss. Havisham, if you could spare the money to do my friend Herbert a lasting service in life, but which from the nature of the case must be done without his knowledge, I could show you how."

  2. Free essay

    Great Expectations

    Therefore when Pip is at breaking point Estella can deliver the final blow to break his heart into pieces, though he has done nothing wrong. She is a very harsh woman as she keeps on repeating "Anything else?"x3 when she is asking what he thinks of Estella this shows she

  1. "Great Expectations"

    "After darkly looking at his leg and at me several times, he came closer to my tombstone, took me both arms, tilted me back as far as he could hold me; so that his eyes looked most powerfully into mine, and mine looked most helplessly up into his."

  2. Compare how the audience and purpose of Dickens' "Great Expectations" and Lively's "The Darkness ...

    At the beginning of the book, Dickens tries to create sympathy for Pip, so that the reader is on Pip's side. This is very important when using a first-person narrator - if the reader isn't on the narrator's side they will not believe what he/she says.

  1. An exploration of the ways in which issues of class and status are presented ...

    to such a great extent that his faults may be simply hidden from the readers view, or indeed perhaps the story is told from Leo's point of view in order to allow Hartley to express his admiration. Even so, Leo the adolescent is also a bad judge of character and

  2. Great Expectations"- How does Dickens create sympathy ...

    Wemmick instructs Pip to "Nod away at him Mr Pip; that's what he likes". Although, Wemmick does not force The Aged to do anything he does not want to do. Wemmick is keen to impress Pip with his father's unusual behaviour.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work