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Great Expectations Role of Magwitch

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Magwitch Appears Twice Unexpectedly in Pip's Life, With Traumatic Effect and Dramatic Consequences. Show how Dickens Brings These Episodes to Life, Commenting on his Style and how the Character is Portrayed. In Your Answer, you Should Concentrate on Close Analysis of Chapter 1 and 39. Charles Dickens, the author of Great Expectations was born in 1812 and spent his early childhood living in Portsmouth. His family then moved to Chatman which was located next to the River Thames marshes, and it is here that the scene of Great Expectations was set. Great Expectations is regarded, as one of Dickens's darkest and more reflective novels as it contains passages of grim realism based on criminal London and within Great Expectations, Dickens's uses a fairy tale plot, which he treats ironically. Dicken's uses his own personal experiences within Great Expectations, as when he was a small boy his father became a criminal by not paying his debts. This gives the reader of Great Expectation's a grim realisation that the character of Magwitch could have been based on his criminal father. Dicken's also grew up as a poor boy, because of his father's time in prison. Dicken's had to work within factories to earn money, but then began writing and became what he is today, one of the best authors of English literature. These characteristics shown by Dicken's are also expressed by Pip in great Expectations, as Pip is a poor boy with nothing about himself, but then he suddenly becomes a man with great expectations thus he then becomes well-off and never poor again. However, many agree that Great Expectations is a great example of and bildungsroman (and educational novel) but it also shows traces of using an older form of fiction called the Picaresque novel. Dickens novels are often regarded as being part if his own personal experiences which have affected him in later life. ...read more.


These great expectations allow Pip to continue his life in London and he can become a gentleman and this is all due to the large amount of money that Pip has received. However, Pip does not realise who the true donator of the money is and suspects that it is Miss Havisham who is supplying Pip with the good fortune, as Miss Havisham uses the solicitor who is looking after Pip's investments and he also believes that Miss Havisham is helping Pip to become a gentleman so that he can eventually marry Estella. Because of Pip's good fortune, he moves to London where he is educated in the most high society way by his friend Mr Pocket. Together they spend Pip's money on posh high society parties, however Pip does still not know whom the supplier and kind donator of his money is and does not find out until his second meeting with Magwitch. Pip and Magwitch's second meeting takes place in chapter 39 and within the first paragraph its shows the reader how the style of how the story is told is similar and also the first paragraph updates the audience with Pip's own personal circumstances, the fact that he is now a gentlemen and lives in London with Mr Pocket. Throughout this chapter, Dicken's continuously makes similarities in settings and emotions with are incredibly similar to that of chapter 1. As mentioned above the opening paragraph of chapter 39 is similar to that of chapter 1 as it introduces the character of Pip. Although the character has changed, the audience is still made aware of who he is and what he is now doing. Dicken's then uses Pip state of mind, his loneliness, as though he is again the little boy who the reader first met in the graveyard. "I was alone, and had a dull sense of being alone." This quote conveys to the audience that although Pip has now grown up and has become a gentleman, he is still the same little boy as he always was. ...read more.


After comparing both chapters, I believe that the trauma that Pip faces in both is greater in chapter 1.I believe this, as Pip was a young boy and what appeared top be a strange evil man who was a convict asked for his help and he gave it to him. This experience would have been terrifying for a young boy and the experience would have left him emotionally scared for the rest of his life. This is shown in the case of Pip, as Pip had pushed his and Magwitch's first meeting to the back on o his mind where other painful memories like the death of his family and his evil sisters were stored. Whereas in the second meeting of Magwitch and Pip, Pip reacts very badly to the news that Magwitch is the provider of his great expectations and the only trauma cause, is that of the old memories stored in the back of his mind being re - opened. Within both chapters 1 and 39, Dicken's continuously uses his effective writing technique and use of suspense to create a dramatic and amazing effect. For this suspense, Dicken's continuously uses metaphors, alliteration, personification, patterns of three, similes and many more writing techniques to create the correct atmosphere for the reader when reading Great Expectations. In chapter 1, Dickens use of creative style and imagery creates the perfect atmosphere and setting for chapter 1, especially with the uneasiness that Pip feels when being confronted by Magwitch. In chapter 2, Dicken's use a creative use of description especially on the weather. Within this chapter, Dicken's is constantly commenting on the weather with the use of personification and other writing skills and this helps enormously create the sense of suspense and mystery for chapter 39 before and during the meeting between Magwitch and Pip. All in all, in chapters, Dicken's writing style and language uses create an amazing sense of achievement and bewilderment to the audience, thus increasing the suspense and tension with the meetings between Magwitch and Pip. ?? ?? ?? ?? Great Expectations Deborah Britland ...read more.

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