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"Growing Up, Cassie's Visit to Strawberry"

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Introduction

"Growing Up, Cassie's Visit to Strawberry" Nick Howland 9G Cassie is a twelve year old black girl from a loving family in the southern state of Mississippi. She does not understand why racism occurs and why white people ridicule their culture and background. In this chapter there are three main incidents that change Cassie from an innocent young black girl to a worldly girl facing the harsh reality of racism first hand. Cassie was woken at 3.30 in the morning by Big Ma. Cassie had never been to Strawberry before and was very excited. She was allowed to sit up front on the wagon with Big Ma, however she was disappointed that T.J. was going with them but she had no choice. Cassie expected the town of Strawberry to be extremely modern, built up and sprawling but instead it was something very ordinary, " a sad, red place". ...read more.

Middle

Mr Barnet left T.J.'s list and bag on the side and served the white woman. By this time Cassie was a little impatient but understood that her elders should get priority. Several minutes later Mr Barnett returned and picked up T.J.'s list and continued to fill the bag. A short time later Mr Barnett's wife called for him and he walked away. Cassie and Stacey decided to leave T.J. and go back to the wagon. On the way out Cassie saw Mr Barnett serving a white girl of a similar age to herself. Thinking Mr Barnett had simply forgotten, she politely asked "I think you was waiting on us, 'fore you was waiting on this girl here". Mr Barnett did not look up so she assumed he did not hear her. As she was close to the end of the counter she went round and politely tugged on his shirt to get his attention. ...read more.

Conclusion

He used violence on Cassie only because she is black. Cassie has a strong feeling of fair play like her Uncle Hammer and will not apologise. She was treated like an animal by Mr Simms and Lillian Jean. Big Ma was a coward in Cassie's eyes but if Big Ma hadn't told Cassie to apologise to the white people, Cassie may have been hurt regardless of her age. In this chapter Cassie is forced into the facts of racism but is too young to understand. She only just realises that her family are treated as second-class citizens every day. Plan Paragraph one: Introduction and setting the scene. Paragraph two: Cassie's feelings and thoughts until reaching Strawberry (pages 79 and 80). Paragraph three: The market field with white people at the front, black people at the back (pages 81 and 82). Paragraph four: Visit to the mercantile and the incident with Mr Barnett (pages 84 to 86). Paragraph five: The sidewalk, collision with Lillian Jean (pages 87 to 89). Paragraph six: Summing up. ...read more.

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