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Growing Up- Lord of the Flies

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Introduction

Growing Up Growing up is a time of great change. Challenges and difficulties arise for individuals which changes them. This statement has been explored on many levels and can be related to many forms of writing and film. In the novel "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding, the characters are exposed to intense hardship and difficulties. The pressure of being stranded on a deserted island with no means of getting off conflicts with the boys' knowledge of moral conduct and leadership. Ralph who is a prime example of the vulnerability of children to lurking dangers displays a good sense of leadership and civilized intelligence. He puts his knowledge and skills into practice in all the scenarios he faces. Jack, another character in "Lord of the Flies" depicts the story of a greedy boy lusting for more and more power. His inhumane behaviour lands everyone in a place where a wrong move can mean the difference between life and death. ...read more.

Middle

Jack is a character of high power and control. This helps to understand knowing that he was in charge of the choir/ hunters. "I ought to be chief," said Jack with simple arrogance, "because I'm chapter chorister and head boy. I can sing C sharp." As an adolescent Jack has already developed an excessive sense of authority. His position in this story can be related to government and politics. He demonstrates the wanting for being on top and draws in people to taking his side and turning them against his competitors. This is a sign of both maturity and childs play. The way in which he uses his power is against the principles of society. The stress of being on a deserted island "messes" with Jack's line of thoughts and therefore affects his decision-making. Paikea is a strong-willed, spiritual, self-conscious girl. She illustrates how her determination and belief helped in resolving her crisis. ...read more.

Conclusion

Through close observation of the characters and how they were portrayed in each story it is easy to assume that adolescence is a time of great change, not just physically but also mentally and socially. As seen with Ralph and Jack, there are many differentials as well as similarities between each other because everybody has their own techniques in handling situations and the way they react to such complications like being stranded on a deserted island. In "Lord of the Flies", William Golding presents his characters as flies, the lord symbolises the leader and as adolescents the children have a position in their life whether they want to lead or follow. Ralph shows a determination for maintaining civilization on the island he exhibits a good sense of maturity, unlike Jack who displays himself as someone who just wants to be head of the pack for the sake of being the superior one. In "Whale Rider", Paikea reveals a spiritual side of her; she is seen as mystical and unpredictable. During her time as an adolescent she faces a world of exploration, knowledge and realisation. 1 ...read more.

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