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Had it not been for Lady Macbeth's intervention, Macbeth would not have murdered Duncan. How far do you agree with this statement?

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Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� EG����D�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0�Hbjbj�2�2 (V�X�X�=�������������������8� �$��v""""""""jllllll$aR�8��"""""���""�888"�"�"j8"j88J��J" ��Y�P���"Jj�0�J� "� J������� �J ""8"""""��8Had it not been for Lady Macbeth's intervention, Macbeth would not have murdered Duncan. How far do you agree with this statement? I think that Lady Macbeth had a huge part to play in the murder of Duncan even though it was not her own hands that committed the crime. Her persuasion and interference cause Macbeth to go ahead with the murder. Macbeth was persuaded by Lady Macbeth to murder Duncan as she claimed it was the only way he would be able to excel as higher than his status at that time. She called him a coward and a bad excuse for a man. This therefore made Macbeth feel uneasy and under pressure from the person he loved most in life. His constant feeling of unease was the decider for killing Duncan. An act which from the eyes of Lady Macbeth was heroic. However, Macbeth was most scared by his actions whereas Lady Macbeth stayed stronger to begin with. Power and his ambitions took over his mind. Lady Macbeth is portrayed as a very controversial character. The audiences of Shakespeare�s time believed strongly in witchcraft and the world of magic, so this play should have been well received. The bard would have known this and intended to make Lady Macbeth into a person who the audiences could take pleasure in watching. I personally believe that there is no straight answer to this question, as she appears to change dramatically during the course of the text. When we first come into contact with Lady Macbeth, she is reading a letter from Macbeth. She seems to be obsessed by the predictions of the three weird sisters, and then is concerned that Macbeth is not strong enough to capture what has been predicted to him; �too full of the milk of human kindness� This shows us that she is a very dogmatic and ruthless person, who is wiling to devour the faults of her own husband in an effort to feed her appetite for power. ...read more.

Middle

This is Shakespeare�s way of making Lady Macbeth look even more fiendish, 'cause it makes Macbeth look morally stronger, so contrasting with his wife. Finally she undermines his valour, and his honesty, by saying that he is breaking a promise to her, and that she would not do the same; �dashed the brains out, had I so sworn as you have done to this� She uses terribly vivid and horrific imagery to assert her position of power within the dialogue, and then gives the killer blow, by saying that she would kill her own child if she had promised it to him. This is, in effect, a double-edged sword, as it is also humiliating the fact that they do not have children, and Banquo does. This would have been distressing because the witches, who now seem so like Lady Macbeth, who has changed to be similar in soul to them, promised Banquo his child/ren as King/s. Exhibitions of Lady Macbeth�s fiendishness such as this example reassert her reputation as a fiend-like queen. By this point, she has convinced him that there is no option but to go ahead with the heinous crime of regicide, which is a feat in itself, yet she has also managed to manipulate him so well that he is hanging on every word she says; �If we should fail?� She now knows that he is desperate to do this because she has convinced him. She then reveals that she has already formulated a plan to kill Duncan. �What cannot you and I perform upon th�unguarded Duncan?� Not only has she planned how to remove the guards, she includes herself in the act itself, which is a fiendish way of convincing Macbeth that she is part of this as well as just himself. This would give him some quiet confidence, and also want to do the whole act, to prove his manliness to his wife. ...read more.

Conclusion

Macbeth's life seemed to take a turn that seemed for the better but back fired as he became obsessed and adored power and a better status, such as king. Lady Macbeth's life turned from being dominant to a complete wreck. She wasn't really in control of her own life, and she couldn't fully look after herself never mind Macbeth. This therefore makes me still think about that Lady Macbeth was the reason for Duncan's death but Macbeth wanted what happened next. Lady Macbeth started of being a feisty character but she lost her sparkle. Therefore killed herself. This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ �E�EQFRF�F�F5G6G�G�GHH�H�H�H�H������������h�`h�`OJQJh�`h�`CJOJQJ%h�`h�`OJQJfHq� ����)h�`h�`CJOJQJfHq� ����h�`hP`y hP`yh�`������� � s t ���UV-.���"�"�&�&#*�����������������������������gdP`y�E�H��#*$*q+r+"-#-//�0�0*2+2�2�2 4 4�4�4�7�7�8�8�:�:�;�;�=�=@@�����������������������������gdP`y@AA�C�CCDDD�D�D�D�D�ERFSFTFUF�F�F�F�F6G7G8G9G�G�G�G��������������������������$a$gd�`$a$gd�`gdP`y�G�GHHHH�H�H�H�H�H�H�����������gdP`y$a$gd�`$a$gd�` &1�h:pP`y��/ ��=!�'"�'#��$��%��D@�D NormalCJ_H aJmH nHsH tHDA@�D Default Paragraph FontRi�R Table Normal�4� l4�a� (k�(No ListDZ@�D P`y Plain TextCJOJQJ^JaJ4@4 �`Header ���!4 @4 �`Footer ���!`�o"` �`watermark header$a$CJOJQJfHq� ����N�o2N �`watermark footer$a$ CJOJQJ�@V����r�V�:���H%#*@�G�H&()*�H'3�=�@��alex��`P`y�@�=L���@P@��Unknown������������G��z ��Times New Roman5V��Symbol3&� �z ��Arial7&�� �VerdanaG5�� �����h�MS Mincho-�3� fg?5� �z ��Courier New"1���h�@�F�@�F�@�F2 �2'2 �2'$�������4>>3�� H�?������������������P`y��WHad it not been for Lady Macbeth's intervention, Macbeth would not have murdered DuncanTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedalexalex�� ��Oh��+'��0���`p�, <H d p | ������XHad it not been for Lady Macbeth's intervention, Macbeth would not have murdered DuncanUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedanalexewoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedan>Downloaded from Coursework.Info - http://www.coursework.info/is Normal.dotfalexl.d2exMicrosoft Word 10.0@@���P��@���P��@���P��2 �2�� ��Õ.��+,��D��Õ.��+,���t���H����� ���� � T�UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited,UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited,UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited,(>'>A XHad it not been for Lady Macbeth's intervention, Macbeth would not have murdered Duncan Titled@���+K_PID_LINKBASE CopyrightDownloaded FromCan RedistributeOwner�A4http://www.coursework.comcoursework.comehttp://www.coursework.comthNo, do not redistributecoursework.com/ !"#$%&'()*+����-./0123����56789:;����=>?@ABC��������F����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Root Entry�������� �F��Y�P��H�1Table��������,WordDocument��������(VSummaryInformation(����4DocumentSummaryInformation8������������<CompObj������������j������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���� �FMicrosoft Word Document MSWordDocWord.Document.8�9�q ...read more.

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