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hakespeares tragic heros dying words: loved not wisely, but too well, reflects the downfall of the fated general Othello

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Introduction

Othello Shakespeare's tragic hero's dying words: "loved not wisely, but too well", reflects the downfall of the fated general Othello. From the beginning of the tragedy, Othello is portrayed as a poor judge of character, which is shown by his inability to distinguish fact from fiction, which fuels his insane jealousy. Othello's love for Desdemona once a harmless obsession soon becomes possessive and ultimately fatal. Othello's mental instability is due to all the consuming emotions, which took over his sense of reason and logic. He becomes outraged, consumed with anger and jealousy. He realises all too late that he did not have concrete evidence of Desdemona's guilt. The jealousy blinded him and restricted him from acknowledging the truth. His self-recognition redeems him somewhat at the close of the play, as he admits his wrong -doing. Othello's near obsession, his idealistic and naive love for Desdemona, was cleverly manipulated. They are viewed by others as mismatched, referred to as a moor he is associated with brutality, ignorance, evil and sexual immorality, all of which are unacceptable and unprincipled. In the beginning of the play Othello describes his feelings for Desdemona by declaring his love for her publicly, which reflects his passion and also the way in which he tries to persuade others of his love for her. He argues that she has enriched his life by loving him: "I did thrive in this fair lady's love". In doing so, one can assume he hopes that Desdemona's father, Brabantio will identify this genuine quality and value it, in terms of considering a reconciliation to the marriage. Othello attempts to communicate to Brabantio that his love for Desdemona and their relationship is actually based on the nature of love: "I love her, that she did pity" this quote describes the compassion and emotion shown towards Othello by Desdemona. Furthermore, Othello also states: "she loved me for the dangers I had passed"; this reflects his justification of Desdemona's love for him. ...read more.

Middle

Othello is wanting and knows she is innocent, but the evidence again outweighs this. Due to the fact he has been made a fool and disrespected as his wife has been having an affair with his own officer whom he loved: "the justice of it pleases", by strangling Desdemona, Othello makes it more personal and it is more physical, therefore there is more of an impact and evidence to acknowledge. The imagery associated with the central theme jealousy suggests the destructive, terrifying and perhaps unnatural qualities of this emotion. The following metaphor: "green- eyed monster"' reflects the way in which jealousy is portrayed as a monster and is used as a comparison, this metaphor is extended: "meat in the person", consumed by Othello it makes the individual look stupid. Jealousy can be referred to as horrid, disfigured and associated with destruction. Iago suggests that if you don' love your wife you don't have jealousy: "Who dotes yet doubts, suspects yet fondly loves", he implies Desdemona is having an affair, using hints all of which add to make a perfect picture. Furthermore, the following quotes: "the meat it feeds on", allows one to suggest that there is a strong sense of devouring and being devoured in these images, which fits in with Iago's description of Othello as being: "eaten up with passion". These lines suggest the exact quality of Othello's monumental jealousy; once he became convinced that his wife is unfaithful, his jealousy does indeed feed itself, leading the hero to behave monstrously. Jealousy is also deeply humiliating in Othello; Iago is correct when he says that it is: "A passion most un-suiting such a man", as the noble moor of Venice Iago's words have a significant and substantial affect on Othello both psychologically and physically. For example, Iago suggests that Desdemona is having sexual relations with other men, possibly Cassio. These suggestions put Othello into a state of emotional turmoil that he is lost in a trance. ...read more.

Conclusion

Othello had announced: "My life upon her faith", this reflects the way in which he has gone back on his word, as his patience and respect was no longer. Iago cleverly manipulated Othello's near obsession, his idealistic and na�ve love for Desdemona. However, after realizing he had been tricked into believing the lies of Iago, Othello could not handle the anguish of knowing he had murdered in jealousy rather than for justice. This deterioration in Othello's character brought the strong warrior back into the scene. Where he transformed into his own judge, jury and sentenced himself: "loved not wisely but too well", one may suggest this reflects Othello's redeemed nature. From this it is possible to suggest that the audience forgives Othello for killing Desdemona. One person in particular who responds very strongly to Othello's treatment towards Desdemona is Lodovico. He is deeply shocked by what he has witnessed; he cannot believe that this is the: "noble moor whom passion could not shake?" After the general has departed, almost incomprehensible in his rage, Iago tells Lodovico, with assumed reluctance, that Othello has been guilty of worse actions than striking his wife: "What I have seen and known", one can imply Lodovico's comments about Othello's strange behaviour gives Iago the perfect opportunity to undermine his stature further. Lodovico cannot believe that these are heroic qualities and that this is the same man who fought on the battlefield to pronounce his country with victory, would murder his wife. Lodovico's judgement of Othello can be referred to as accurate, as Othello was not in a normal state of mind but was acting according to jealousy, which caused other emotions to come into play. The nature of anger caused him to become short-tempered and aggressive, also hatred, which did not allow him to be considerate, and as a result he suffered. Furthermore, Othello's gullibility allowed him to believe accusations made by the manipulative Iago, and therefore could not distinguish fact from fiction. English Literature 1 Nadir Jagvani ...read more.

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