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Hamlet is a good example of how vengeance ultimately ends up taking more lives then was originally lost.

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Introduction

Vengeance What is vengeance? Is there an exact science to the word vengeance? Vengeance to me is the act of reciprocating after an event has happened in either an equal or greater manner to what has already been done. Vengeance distorts logic due to the suffering that one experiences due to something horrible that might have happened to them. They feel as if they must return the pain to the wrong doer and usually, they will do anything they can to get even, even if they have to hurt many other people along the way. Hamlet is a good example of how vengeance ultimately ends up taking more lives then was originally lost. ...read more.

Middle

In the end, Hamlet's strive to get revenge for his father's death, turns into a mass murder-suicide, him being one of the many who are lost. Another character from Hamlet is Polonius, a sneaky councilor of the State, friend of Claudius, and father of Ophelia and Laertes. Polonius does not get along well with Hamlet at all and instead lends an offer many times to spy on Hamlet. By spying on Hamlet, he is returning what Hamlet is supposedly doing to his home. Hamlet is Laertes' biggest competition in life, while ultimately they have many of the same characteristics, they are very different, and Polonius and Laertes both do not like him. ...read more.

Conclusion

The last thing that drives her to her death was the murder of her father Polonius. While she didn't always agree with him, she loved him very much. Before she kills herself, Ophelia starts to sing songs instead of actually speaking to someone, songs that girls in this society should not sing, "Tomorrow is Saint Valentine's day, All in the morning betime, And I a maid at your window, To be your Valentine. Then up he rose, and donned his clothes, And dupped the chamber door, Let in the maid that out a mad Never departed more" (Act IV, Scene V, Lines 50-57). After speaking in song, The Queen and King become very worried for her health, as they should be. No one was expecting what was about to follow in the next Act. ...read more.

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