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Hamlet is a well-known tragedy written by William Shakespeare in the year 1600.

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Introduction

- Introduction: Hamlet is a well-known tragedy written by William Shakespeare in the year 1600. It is about a Prince of Denmark who at the beginning of the play is murdered by his own brother named Claudius. Claudius then takes the throne, and in the process marries the old king's wife and Hamlet's mother, Gertrude. Hamlet then, later on in the play finds out about his fathers unnatural murder. But instead of revenging his father's death, he dilly dallies a lot therefore elongating the play, but in the end avenges his father's death by justly slaying his murderous uncle Claudius. Although many other characters as well as Claudius die by the end the play this includes Hamlet himself. In all the plays of William Shakespeare's tragedies, there are main characters or is a main character. These main characters almost always have fatal flaws, for example, Othello's was jealousy, Macbeth's was ambition, and Hamlets fatal flaw was delay. A fatal flaw is fault or problem usually in the main character or protagonist, which causes them to act (or in Hamlet's case not to act) in a certain way that will affect the plot of the play. In "Hamlet", the fatal flaw of Hamlet is that he is by nature an indecisive and procrastinative person, this inability to act or to decide is what drags out, prolongs, and makes "Hamlet" such a long play. You can also tell that Hamlets character is quite a thoughtful one as during the play he speaks a total number of seven soliloquies, the most spoken in any one of William Shakespeare's plays. What a soliloquy is is basically when a character speaks to him or her self-letting out their feelings when they are alone on stage. (Sometimes the person speaking the soliloquy is not actually alone, but may be being spied on. "Hamlet" is a particular type of tragedy, aptly named a revenge tragedy, wherein the revenger (Hamlet) ...read more.

Middle

However, at the end Hamlet suddenly calms down he must keep for now his thoughts to himself: "But break my heart for I must hold my tongue." - Soliloquy number two- Act 2, Scene 2 (Hamlets 3rd soliloquy) This second soliloquy of Hamlets is taking place in the hall in which one of the actors have just done a small speech from a play and did his part so well that he actually cried when he came to a sad part of the speech. This Hamlet reflects upon and thinks to himself that by doing this the player has without realising it offended and criticised him, Hamlet for not acting upon the death and murder of his father. This makes him angry, and he actually curses himself. He then towards the end of the soliloquy that the way to find out whether the ghost was speaking the truth to him, would be to make the players play something like the death of his father. The first line of the soliloquy shows how much has been waiting to be by himself so as to think, for he says goodbye to the other characters and actually says aloud to himself "now I am alone". As if he has for some time now been waiting to be so. Straight after his recognition of this fact he immediately curses himself "O what a rouge and peasant slave am I", the reason for this seemingly uncalled for and sudden outburst, is that he feels infuriated by his lack of action he has taken on his revenge. This at the moment has just been highlighted by the player's performance. When he, the player recited out a small speech from a play. The player was thus so moved by the tragedy of the play, started to shed tears and go pale, in fact his whole body language reflected how he felt when saying these lines, as Hamlet states here "all his visage waned, tears in his eyes". ...read more.

Conclusion

He refers to the army marching forth before him led by Prince Fortinbras of Norway. Hamlet it seems appears to show some respect for this young man who is in the exact same position as himself. Fortinbras's father is dead and his uncle has snatched the Norwegian throne. Hamlet then says to himself if this young prince can lead a whole army into battle, then who is Hamlet if he cannot slay one man, and on top of that, it is to take revenge on his father's death. He emphasises on this by describing Fortinbras as "a delicate and tender prince". And as of where Hamlet thinks he stands now he here sums it up: "how stand I then, that have had a father killed, a mother stained and let all sleep". As if to put himself down even further he states how some noble men will argue for silly reasons just for the sake of dignity, pride and honour, as he simply quotes: "But greatly to find quarrel in the straw when honours at stake". He says after this that he is ashamed to watch so many men go to their deaths, fighting for a piece of land hardly big enough to fight on or bury the dead! He hyperbolises as he makes his point clear by saying: "while to my shame I see the immanent deaths of twenty thousand men". While in fact there are actually only two thousand men marching off to war. He ends this soliloquy on a very determined and decisive note which is: "Oh from this day forth my thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth". He has decided that from now on nothing but revenge and that everything else is unimportant. I noted also that it was a rhyming couplet which ended the soliloquy which adds more emphasis on the last two lines which makes the words and there meaning linger in your head and think that this is it, hamlet will finally put his words into action. ...read more.

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