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Holden has no one to blame

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Kyle Leisering 10/5/08 Mrs. Miller 11 AP English Holden Caulfield Has No One To Blame "I felt so lonesome, all of the sudden. I almost wished I was dead." (Salinger 48). In this quote by Holden Caulfield he states that he is lonely enough to the point where he would almost give up his life and everything in it. But in reality, every move Holden makes brings him closer and closer to feeling and being alone. From fighting with one of the only friends he has and going out on his own; then to running away from the one person who may have been trying to help him turn this life around; and finally to wanting to live by himself as a deaf mute out west in a cabin. Each of these behaviors are crucial in the result of Holden becoming more isolated throughout the story, and each of them are his own doing. To avoid isolation and loneliness, probably the most important key to have in your life is friends. ...read more.


Now he must find other means of taking positive steps, which proves to be rather difficult for him. Holden's staying in the city turns out to be the opposite of what he is hoping for as a few events only make him more depressed, leading him to one of his former teacher's house to talk things over, this teacher is Mr. Antollini. Holden explains that when a boy committed suicide at Pencey Prep. the only adult figure to respond in a respectful and caring way was Mr. Antollini, and for that Holden holds respect for him above others. As soon as Holden explains his situation to him with being kicked out of school, he immediately invites Holden to stay at his home. Mr. Antollini discusses with Holden that he is setting himself up for this great fall in life and that he is there for any guidance Holden may need. Now as Holden has never felt this kind of compassion from anybody he feels a bit uneasy and on the edge, so when he wakes up to Mr. ...read more.


Even though it is not sought through. imagine how drastic this idea really is, and all of it could have been prevented. It possibly could have been stopped by him not leaving his friends, or by not leaving Mr. Antollini. But the fact is that he did and this is now what Holden Caulfield feels, isolation. In reality, wishing to be dead is not very far from Holden's deaf mute fantasy. In fact, the quote of "I felt so lonesome, all of the sudden. I almost wished I was dead." (Salinger 48), by him actually previews this fantasy of his taking place later in the book; as the fantasy of him never speaking to anyone again basically acts out the idea of being dead. Only this time there are not multiple people to point the finger at, the fault can fall on only one individual. That person is responsible for the behaviors of abandoning those who were ultimately there to help. So as each person is responsible for their own behavior and actions, even if those actions point them in a direction they did not wish to go, in this case, isolation. That blame falls on Holden Caulfield. ...read more.

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