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hound of baskerville

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Introduction

HOUND OF BASKERVILLE By Lekhraj Newoor Introduction This is an evaluation and analysis and evaluation of chapter 6 and 7 in one of the best detective stories ever created and this popular book that I'm doing an essay called The Hound of Baskerville, I am going to use the P.E.E, Point, Explanation, and Example. I've red threw the hall entire book and I never found something I don't like but I found it out standing the way the story was all set up and we are suppose to give our own explanation and theory's on how the story ends and what ever will happen next, Conan Doyle introduced the detective Sherlock Holmes in 1887, Chapter six and seven of the Hound of the Baskervilles are important in the novel, because they introduce us to the main characters that are later suspects in the murder of Sir Charles so its now up to Sherlock Holmes the greatest unmatched crime solver. The Hound Of The Baskervilles Our encounter with the Stapleton's provides more questions, "What sort of facts?" on PAGE 84 Watson was asking questions to himself. When Stapleton's first meets Watson, he asks all kind of questions to Holmes about the case, and about Sir Henry. On the over hand, we are suppose to believe that the convicts behaviour makes him look suspicious, Selden is a convicted killer who recently escaped out of prison. On the other hand, we are also supposed to believe that Mr Stapleton is trustworthy, and his actions make him appear to be a concerned person and an unsuspicious character. ...read more.

Middle

Moving onto chapter seven, we find out that Barrymore has again been classified as the prime suspect. In the attempt to discover who the sobbing woman was, Watson and Sir Henry question Barrymore. "It seemed to me that the pallid feature of the butler turned a shade paler still as he listened to his master's questions." This is a crystal clear suggestion that Barrymore has something to hide, that he's not just a simple butler. Barrymore says that there are two women in the house and it could not have been his wife, Mrs Barrymore. However when Watson meets Mrs Barrymore: "but her tell-tale eyes were red and glanced at me from solid lids." Already round this pale-featured, handsome, black bearded man there was gathering an atmosphere of mystery and of gloom." This is proof that Barrymore was lying and is probably up to something. Again, this is another diversion from the man they're after; who we find out is Stapleton, as this text manifests a sense of cunning about Barrymore, and "cunning" symbolises the villain. Of course, Conan Doyle is trying to distract us in the future of Stapleton's by arousing suspicions of the innocent, in this case, Barrymore, which is always the nature of such stories, For it would be pointless to for it to be called a mystery story in such a case, when the real killer is so exposed from the start and throughout and in the end the reader discovers him to be the actual murderer. ...read more.

Conclusion

Chapter seven also includes some powerful, repugnant description of Dartmoor, such as "dark cliff", "undulating downs", and the "crest of jagged granite foaming up into surges", making the empty land seem like a savage winter sea, in which one could drown with ease. A great and highly suitable setting for the horrific events that have yet to occur. An ambient trap immersing its victims into snapping jaws. Conclusion In conclusion I have discussed all the points that I thought were necessary and of significance. I have analyzed key situations and events such as the Stapleton's being husband and wife, the diversion of Barrymore from the true killers and the good written and hooking descriptions of the settings. Conan Doyle, I though, I did a great job of concealing the villain and especially of creating that haunted, foreboding feel of the moor, always throwing the reader on the edge and making sure they stay there. A well written masterpiece that deserves the rank of one of the greatest mystery stories ever written, for it is secretive, a component highly needed by books of this genre and clever, to mould and shape the readers thoughts and feelings in any direction it desires. The moor was painted in a dull way with dark colours just to make it even creepier but in some pieces of the story is confusing I think the author, Conan Doyle was meant to do that to keep the ready away from the secrets. ...read more.

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