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How 'An Inspector Calls' invites us to apportion blame for the death of Eva Smith.

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Introduction

How 'An Inspector Calls' invites us to apportion blame for the death of Eva Smith In 1946 a play was first performed, this play was performed under the name of 'An Inspector Calls'. The play was written by J B Priestly. It was being performed at a time when people who were the audience to his play were recovering from the second world war, and in addition to this a number of man made disasters caused by society and community's views, opinions and perspectives from different sides of arguments. These disasters include general strike in 1926, two world wars, the Russian revolution in 1917 The national insurance act in 1911 and the sinking of the ship which society called unsinkable the Titanic. However it wasn't just a coincidence that the story line and the recent disasters clashed, this was one of the points J B Priestly was attempting to get across to the audience. He attempts to create and express ideas and feelings about themes, attitudes about society and how he uses characters personalities to express all of this through language and the plays structure. I have been asked to explore the theme of responsibility in 'An Inspector Calls' and how J B Priestly communicates his ideas to his audience through the medium of drama. ...read more.

Middle

When it comes down to having to tell the truth he needs an alcoholic beverage meaning that his perspective he can't cope with what he has committed. In the end Eric can see he is the end of a disfunctional community, which has led to disaster and is mature enough to admit what he has done, which is ironic since his mother treats him like a child. Gerald is startled by the news instantly which is portrayed in the tone of his voice as he realises who the victim is. At first he is hesitant to accept any connections to her but as the play proceeds the inspector slowly breaks him down and he takes responsibility and admits to his entire affair. At that moment Sheila is treated on the same adolescent level as Gerald and an equal to him in their relationship, this signifies a break in tradition, which has tried to be maintained throughout the play. This slowly deteriorates as a tradition along with the images of socially, economically and politically correct which all characters attempt to portray. However the inspector allows arguing and bickering between the characters revealing and exposing the cracks in their less than perfect images. ...read more.

Conclusion

The play can relate to different people in the ordinance on all different levels and is almost a warning that you can't predict the future. For example Mr. Birling thought that there was 'to much to lose to for a war to happen' it applies with knock on effects as well. However you can't separate yourself from society because you need it to exist, and you have a certain responsibility within society, everywhere and everyone is part of some society, which can have a great effect on peoples lives and lifestyles. Society shouldn't be taken for granted. I think that this play if it were performed as it was originally written would not be relevant the modern day audience. Simply because the class system doesn't exist to the same importance as it did when the play was first performed, but now more than ever society and community is needed because of some recent historical events related to terrorist attacks and other major social faults. If the theme was altered but the messages were the same with the same tension and impact as the original it would succeed in relating its messages. ...read more.

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