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How and why does Dickens show the changing relationship between Pip & Joe?

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Introduction

Great Expectations: GCSE Coursework Essay Q: How and why does Dickens show the changing relationship between Pip & Joe? The relationship between Pip and Joe is one of the focal points of 'Great Expectations.' Initially there is a strong, brotherly bond between the two. Their relationship then breaks down as Pip, feeling ashamed of his background and upbringing, moves to London to pursue his dream of being a gentleman. Finally, Pip returns to the forge at the end of the novel, having seen the error of his ways; and is reconciled with Joe. Dickens uses the characters of Pip and Joe, and their changing relationship, to show the true value of a 'gentle man' as opposed to a 'gentleman.' The main literary technique used to show the relationship at various stages of the novel is language, which Dickens uses extremely effectively throughout the narrative. At the start of the novel, Pip and Joe share an easy-going, friendly relationship. Being fellow sufferers at the hands of Mrs. Joe, they naturally come together and grow to be very close. Their intimacy can be easily seen by the way they speak. They are very relaxed and laid-back when together, as shown by phrases like "wot larx" 1 and "ever the best of friends"2 - a phrase repeated constantly by Joe. ...read more.

Middle

Joe's salutation of "How AIR you, Pip"8 is extremely unnatural and artificial, and is far cry from the laid-back nature of their association at the start of the novel. Joe addresses Pip as "sir," 9 acknowledging his newfound higher status. Joe's simplicity and humility is illustrated by his quiet acceptance of Pip's snobbery and cruelty. He refuses to claim the credit which he rightly deserves for bringing up Pip. This point is established when Joe leaves at the end, saying: "If there's been any fault today, it's mine,"10 a very untrue declaration. Another language device used by Dickens to convey the detachment of the pair is Joe's usage of more sophisticated vocabulary. Joe tries to use more expansive terminology, but his discomfort with these expressions is evident due his mispronunciation of words such as "architectooralooral" Yet again, Joe's dedication and loyalty to Pip is shown by Joe's attempt to live up to Pip's high standards. The use of the formal language point towards a serious breakdown in their relationship, and the principal cause of this is Pip. Following this incident, Pip's subconscious self is subjected to an unsettling sense of guilt and repentance. His inner mind starts to realise how ungrateful he has been towards Joe. ...read more.

Conclusion

it is good morals and virtues which are necessary, Through the use of literary techniques such as language, Dickens is able to successfully relay his message to the readers, and produce a poignant and gripping tale about the moral journey of a young orphan named Pip. 1 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 7, pg. 45 2 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 18, pg. 141 3 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 6, pg. 41 4 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 6, pg. 41 5 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 8, pg. 60 6 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 8, pg. 62 7 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 19, pg. 159 8 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 27, pg. 219 9 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 27, pg. 220 10 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 27, pg. 224 11 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 29, pg. 244 12 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 57, pg. 463 13 "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens - Penguin Classics, Chapter 57, pg. 472 ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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