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How and why does scrooge change in a Christmas carol?

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Introduction

How and why does scrooge change in a Christmas carol? The novel A Christmas Carol was set in England in 1843. The story takes place during the Victorian era. Dickens combines a description of hardships faced by the poor with a heart-rending sentimental celebration of the Christmas season. The novel contains dramatic and comic element as well as a deep felt moral theme. In the beginning of the novel Ebenezer Scrooge is portrayed as a hardhearted and unsociable man. However at the end of the novel we see dramatic changes in him as a trio of ghostly visitations causes a complete change in him. Scrooges transformed from an unpleasant and penny-pinching character to a charitable kind man. The following essay focuses and examines the life of Ebenezer Scrooge, delving into his past, present and supposed future. In the opening of the novel, Scrooge is depicted as a miser who would not even give enough coal to his clerk despite the harsh weather to keep the office warm. His greed is his downfall, because he is so consumed with his money that he neglects people around him. He spends his day counting profits wishing that the whole world would leave him alone. His entire life is based on making more profits. ...read more.

Middle

She is breaking off their engagement crying that greed had corrupted the love Scrooge had once had for her; Scrooge makes no attempt to stop her as he is too consumed with his money. Then Scrooge sees Belle happily married as she talks to her husband about Scrooge. She describes Scrooge as quite alone in the world." The older Scrooge can no longer bear to witness his loss of Belle. He begs the spirit to take him back home. Tormented and full of despair, he reaches home and falls asleep immediately. Each episode in the scenes shows a younger Scrooge who was still in touch with human beings, until money overtook his ability to love. His lust for it destroyed his relationship with Belle. These scenes begin the changes in Scrooge as his past is re-enacted. Scrooge awakens gladly to a majestic figure in green robes. His room has undergone a transformation, it is filled with Christmas feasts and other things related to Christmas. Perhaps the transformation of the room is a prelude to his personal transformation. He tells Scrooge his lifespan is one day. The spirit tells Scrooge to touch his robe. Scrooge finds himself in a bustling city on Christmas morning, where he sees Christmas shoppers wishing a "merry Christmas to passers by. ...read more.

Conclusion

Dickens' portrayal of Crachit puts a human face on the poorer classes. The moral of the story is that we are not in this world for our own benefit only but more important others. It is each person's duty to help the less fortunate and that money does not bring about happiness as Scrooge learns. Dickens uses this novel to educate the Victorians, so they can find out the real truth about life. They would find the ending satisfying and at the sane time learn from it. The novel is written in staves, which represents musical staves. Dickens uses staves instead of chapters as a reminder of the musical notation of a Christmas carol. Each of the middle three staves revolve around the ghostly visitations that bring about a change in Scrooge. The writer uses flashbacks to remind us of the past Scrooge and the ways in which he changes. The novel speaks to both Victorians of Dickens's era and people in our present day. His message is universal Christmas is the season of goodwill and a rime to share one's wealth with others less fortunate .Although Scrooge is an extreme example of a miser, perhaps Dickens is saying there is little of Scrooge in all of us whether it is an unwillingness to hare our money with the poor and need or our time with people in need! ...read more.

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