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How did Macbeth respond to the prophecies made by the witches?

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Introduction

ACT 4: SCENE 1 1.How did Macbeth respond to the prophecies made by the witches? Macbeth went to the witches for some answers but the witches didn't give him any straight answers but rather what they did was that they had made a spell and had made their 'masters' (L62) appear in apparitions foretelling and representing the future. Macbeth after seeing the first apparition of an armed head telling him to beware of Macduff, Macbeth said that he had already had his fears on Macduff so he was right, and now it has confirmed his suspicions and now he will listen to the apparitions with truth as he thinks that they will tell him the truth as they have already did. But the apparitions deceive Macbeth with their words. ...read more.

Middle

Now Macbeth with his new found security and arrogance leaps to the more obvious but incorrect, conclusions the more readily because it is what he wanted to hear and that is what Hecate had foretold. Now he has taken in every detail as a good omen but he still wants a last ditch effort in thinking the prophecies of Banquo made at the start of the play was false. Macbeth still thinks that he can control the witches- (L103-104 'I will be satisfied. Deny me this and an eternal curse fall on you. Let me know!) And demands that they answer his question about Banquo's descendants in a desperate hope that they will change their original prediction as Fleance had got away. But as the line of Kings grew longer his confidence fell and realized that his reign would be barren. ...read more.

Conclusion

And so as Lenox said to him that Macduff has fled to England, in his mind Macbeth, although thinks he know that Macduff can't kill him but still now it proves that he is being very paranoid and wants to kill someone that the witches said can't kill him. Also in his mind he resolved to do whenever he thinks of something. This is also ironic as now he is obsessed by the sterility of his own reign his only relief is in taking equally sterile action, action that cuts off from further thinking- (L149 'be it thought and done,') And so his last thoughts in the scene were that he is determined to have immediate action against Macduff's family. And his state of mind in one word to describe it is 'reckless' in doing anything it wanted and so will be very dangerous and troubled. ...read more.

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