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How do all three poets portray city and city life?

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Introduction

How do all three poets portray city and city life? During all three poems, writers convey city life as aggressive and cruel, sometimes obvious but at other times hidden. This is firstly illustrated throughout 'A London Fete' as Coventry Patmore describes the hanging as popular and, during the middle of the unfortunate event people stand and 'enjoy the wicked treat' denoting the violence of their attitudes. Similarly, the author uses harsh vocabulary such as 'cry', 'chaos' and 'half-crushed' suggesting the fear from the crowd as they take pleasure in watching the dreadful hanging. The excited crowds 'eyeballs lit with hell' illuminates the excited horror in everybody's eyes as the convict dies. Many would also view, Blake's 'London' portrays savagery but this is more sharply presented as this poem highlights the brutality all the way through. 'Cry of every man, infants cry of fear' brings out the fear of people from all ages, adults down to children and even babies. Usually, violence is something an infant is not associated with and the author has regularly placed this innocence symbol against the murderous images to make it more of an opposite because violence is a guilty crime and the baby is interested. ...read more.

Middle

The 'Harlot's Curse' is used along with other negative symbols like 'ban' and 'weakness' to make it universalised in a completely opposite way. This is extremely similar to 'In Praise of Cities' as Thom Gunn also does this, but a lot more subtlety. He uses 'irresistible' in an enticing and entrapping way making the negativity seem positive. 'You stay' highlights the influence because you feel like you had been given the choice to leave but you had been directed into staying. These three poems show city life as dominant plenty of times, in obvious and masked ways at different stages throughout. Throughout these three poems poets have used unnatural images to highlight the unusualness of the city and city life. 'In Praise of Cities' by Thom Gunn has many examples of this, firstly 'Her pavements desolate in the dim, dry air' highlighting the stop of growth. 'Desolate' is to feel empty and alone, 'dim, dry' are images of lack of growth, this showing the negativity in life as an all round place, all the same. ...read more.

Conclusion

Throughout the three poems there is a strong sense of lure, enticing you to the city. Firstly, during 'London' by William Blake, there are examples of positive images such as 'marriage', 'child' and 'church', which would usually attract people, but negative signs like 'hearse', which slowly draws the reader in, follow them. The lure of the city in 'London' is not as powerful as it is in 'In Praise of Cities', which uses strong vocabulary. The poem by Thom Gunn uses the sexual overtone to attract people to the city. 'Love making' is an example of sex and it highlights the lure because people are attracted to love and all that comes with it. Here the lure is presented as sexual whereas in 'A London Fete' by Coventry Patmore the crowd and the joining as one attract you. 'Joined the roar' highlights the fact that everyone has the experiences of being in a community. 'Fought for places' also brings out this same effect but shows it as much more violent, however this will still attract people. Lure is highlighted many of times during the three poems but in completely opposite ways. Allen Simmons 10ne ...read more.

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