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How do our views of Magwitch change through the course of the novel and what do you learn from this about Charles Dickens's, attitude towards the penalty system?

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Introduction

How do our views of Magwitch change through the course of the novel and what do you learn from this about Charles Dickens's, attitude towards the penalty system? Great Expectations is about a boy called Pip, who has 'Great Expectations and doesn't want to be poor all his life. Along his way, a lot of strange things happen to him, such as meeting strange people and getting money off unknown people. Great Expectations was wrote in 1860 and was Dickens thirteenth novel. This essay will be about how our views on Magwitch change through the story, such as at the beginning us thinking he is evil and nasty just because he was a convict but then later on we see the good side. As I have already mentioned because of the way Magwitch is presented at first "...A fearful man, all in coarse gray, with a great iron on his leg...." ...read more.

Middle

This shows Magwitches good side again and now we do not see him a 'the convict' but as Magwitch which makes him sound more human. > Then in chapter 41 Pip feels he cannot take any more of Magwitch's money (mostly because Pip is too proud and it is the money of a criminal). At the same time, Pip does not want Magwitch's execution on his hands, which will happen Magwitch is discovered back in England. So Pip and Herbert Pocket the next day try and convince Magwitch to leave England. > In chapter 42 magwitch gets the sympathy vote with use because he explains why he has always stolen things, (because he was hungry etc) There are many other chapter which change Pips outlook of life a little and that change our views of Magwtitch but I feel that I have mention the main one this being in chapter 39 where Pip find out about his benefactor. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is very descriptive in Great Expectations and explains everything that happeneds so you don't have to try all to hard. Even though the language is old-fashioned etc Dickens manages to always make it easier to read, for example if you compare his writing to William Shakespeare's then Charles Dickens's is so much easier to read. Finally to answer the overall question 'How do our views of Magwitch change through the course of the novel and what do you learn from this about Charles Dickens's, attitude towards the penalty system?' I believe that Magwitch, (the escaped convict) ends up changing Pip's life forever! And that Charles, John Huffam Dickens doesn't really like the Penalty system all too much, simply because of he saw how it was and how it affected his Dad. So writing about it in a novel he puts it to shame without him getting put in prison himself. 2 Ashley Deeming 4/20/2007 - 3 - ...read more.

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