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How do the key features of language particularly imagery make the story dramatic and exciting in Romeo & Juliet? How helpful was it for Shakespeare's audience?

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Introduction

Romeo & Juliet How do the key features of language particularly imagery make the story dramatic and exciting in Romeo & Juliet? How helpful was it for Shakespeare's audience? Shakespeare used many aspects of language particularly imagery in many forms to make Romeo & Juliet more dramatic, exciting and interesting for his audience. He managed to make the play more accessible to his audience. Some of whom, in the sixteenth century, somewhat ill-educated. He used language to convey the main concerns of the public i.e. death, love, violence, avarice and wealth. His use of key language features, particularly imagery, helped his audience to understand the feelings of each character and the development of the story of the play. Whilst studying Romeo & Juliet and the impact of the key features of language, particularly imagery that Shakespeare used at the Capulet's ball was dramatic. For example Capulet welcomes his guests at the start of the scene and goes on to discuss the days of the past. "Tis gone, Tis gone, Tis gone", The language used here refers to Capulet's lost youth. ...read more.

Middle

The audience want Juliet to fulfil her dreams by marrying Romeo and ending the ancient feud. Shakespeare used similes and metaphors; this helped the audience to imagine a scene and to exaggerate language to describe the actions acted in the play. "But old folks, many feign as they were dead, Unwieldy, slow, heavy, and pale as lead." (Act 2, Scene 5, line 16-17) "Where on a sudden one hath wounded me, That's by me wounded;" (Act 2, Scene 3, line 50-51) Shakespeare also uses other language skills to make imagery. Sea images are presented throughout the play, the main point of this in my opinion is to liven up the language, and make the themes prominent. Sea images are used to describe how people feel. "In one little body ... The tempest - tossed body." (Act 3, Scene 5, line 130 - 137) Capulet describes how upset Juliet is. He says her eyes are like the sea pouring out salt water, her body's like a boat tossed around by her emotions, and her sighs are like the wind in a terrible storm. ...read more.

Conclusion

The play is a bit of a rollercoaster ride through different types of scenes, such as comic, romantic violence, melodramatic and tragic. The setting helps give each scene the right type of atmosphere and the language helps to express what's going on in the character's mind. For example, the poetic language in the balcony scene helps to create a romantic atmosphere which helps to convince the audiences that they are witnessing true love. "My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep; the more I give to thee the more I love, for both are infinite." (Act 2, Scene 2, line 133 - 135) This enables original audiences to become part of the play and acknowledge what the true symbolic or moral definitions of the play are. Key terms especially imagery helped to create a dramatic play and to help the audiences peruse the minds of characters. In my opinion the play is magnificently structured to emphasise and create atmosphere so that audiences can develop reflection on the character's and the scenes. This shows how important language was in Elizabethan times to entertain audiences with not only actions but also words. ...read more.

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