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How do the last 2 Chapters of 'the Hound of the Baskervilles' show it to be a 'Classic British Detective' Story?

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Introduction

How do the last 2 Chapters of 'the Hound of the Baskervilles' show it to be a 'Classic British Detective' Story? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the Sherlock Holmes novel 'the Hound of the Baskervilles' at the end of the 19th century. The novel is part of the 'Classic British Detective' genre. The genre is made up of the detective being amateur, it is often set in the country or wealthy surroundings, it is often class based, and doesn't often contain violence. A 'Classic British Detective' always traditionally has a sidekick, is very intelligent and has one flaw to show that they too are not perfect. In the case of Sherlock Holmes his sidekick is Dr Watson, he is indeed incredibly intelligent, and he is addicted to opium. Another example of this genre is Agatha Christies' Inspector Poirot, he too has a sidekick, Captain Hastings, as well as his weakness, though it not quite being as bad as Holmes', is vanity. Holmes and Watson's relationship is a strong one, and is held together by a grand admiration on Watson's part. Watson's admiration is proved in the quotation: 'He had never said as much before, and I must admit that his words gave me a keen pleasure, for I had often been piqued by his indifference to my admiration and to the attempts which I have made to give publicity to his methods.' ...read more.

Middle

We can also tell this is set in Victorian times with the use of Watson's gentlemen's club. Neither of these exist in common use today proving that it is set in a different time to our own. The novel itself is about a supposed curse on the family called the Baskervilles. The curse is that an unnaturally large hound will kill all of the Baskervilles that venture on the moor outside their house at night. Holmes and Watson are brought in to investigate the death of Sir Charles Baskerville the Baskerville estate owner, as it is believed to be a murder. Watson is sent up on his own as Holmes has other cases to deal with. In the second to last chapter, called 'The Hound of the Baskervilles', we see Holmes to be a genius in action as the fact he has completely unravelled the curse and has proved it to be physical so that he can actually deal with it, therefore it is definitely a murder case, and the idea of it being anything supernatural has been dismissed. This is proved in the quote "It's dead whatever it is,' said Holmes 'we've laid the family ghost once and forever." ...read more.

Conclusion

I am reckoned fleet of foot, but he outpaced me as much as I outpaced the little professional." "But in the next instant Holmes had emptied five barrels of his revolver into the creature's flank." These quotes show us that even though Watson is good physically and mentally quite sharp, more so even than 'the little professional' Lestrade, he is still incomparable to Holmes 'but he outpaced me as much as I did the little professional'. This shows us that Watson is good mentally and physically and is no way mentally or physically challenged, but compared to Holmes he is inferior. This shows us that Watson plays a good sidekick to Holmes, making it further relevant in showing this book of the 'Classic British Detective' genre. Another thing in the last two chapters shown to us proving the book to be within the 'Classic British detective' genre is that Holmes is an amateur detective shown to us by the presence of Lestrade, the actual police officer who is there to make an actual lawful arrest. "Are you armed Lestrade?' The little detective smiled 'As long as I have my trousers, I have a hip-pocket, and as long as I have a hip-pocket I have something in it". The last two chapters of the book have key factors evident in showing us that 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' is a 'Classic British Detective' novel. ...read more.

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