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How do these writers create suspense and tension through language? What does this add to your impression of the novels overall. Choose two extracts from the novels 'Great expectations' by Charles Dickens, and 'Jane Eyre' by Charlotte Bronte.

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Introduction

English coursework essay 10J2 Ms Baker/Sam Pedwell How do these writers create suspense and tension through language? What does this add to your impression of the novels overall. Choose two extracts from the novels 'Great expectations' by Charles Dickens, and 'Jane Eyre' by Charlotte Bronte, and focus part of your discussion on these. The purpose of this essay is to explore how in the novels 'Great Expectations' and 'Jane Eyre' by Charles Dickens and Charlotte Bronte, the authors use language to create suspense and tension and how this enhances the storyline for a reader. Both these books were written and published during the 18th century and display many of the defining characteristics of a novel written during this time, the popular genre of the time being gothic style which both these books are. Novels back then would not have been written as one book but rather as several short chapter like stories which would have been published over a period of time serially possibly in a local newspaper or magazine, this often creates tension as the chapters would often end abruptly with a cliff-hanger to keep a reader interested. ...read more.

Middle

At the beginning of great expectations the author Charles Dickens immediately sets the scene of what is to come and gives the reader some background information on this character who we know as Pip but does not give away to much information immediately giving a sense of mystery and tempting the reader to read on. 'Ours was the marsh country down by the river', 'this bleak place', these opening lines allow the reader to create a clear picture in their mind of this seemingly dull and dreary place. In the first two lines of this extract Dickens uses these four words, 'marsh' 'river' 'river' and 'sea', the reader very much sees this setting as a watery place so likely to be quite miserable and depressing. This technique is called pathetic fallacy wherein the author uses the description of the setting to emphasize the mood of the character so in this case Pip is likely to be feeling quite fed up and bedraggled, it would all seem a bit overwhelming and a lost cause to him. What could quite easily be any old graveyard is somewhat brought alive by Dickens and his use of very powerful adjectives 'bleak', 'overgrown' to create a sense of helplessness and despair. ...read more.

Conclusion

I found that as a reader this alone contributed to my enjoyment of the novels as the storyline seems more exciting as it moves along at a fast pace keeping the reader interested. To match the chapters are also fairly short allowing both the authors the ability to switch between different scenes to keep the reader always interested and from the very beginning a readers imagination is captured by the dramatic and exciting action packed introduction to the novel. I think that the answers to the questions suggested in the title are that both the authors use many language techniques to create suspense and tension, through the use of techniques such as personification and alliteration they are able to bring a scene alive making it more appealing to a reader, they use repetition to create images of no hope and despair and similes to emphasize a objects qualities and relate it to the situation. Without the language techniques employed by both authors the novels would not be nearly as good at setting the scene and giving vivid descriptions of the settings in which the reader has to picture themselves. By Sam Pedwell. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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