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How do you think the audience at the first London Performance of 'Hobson's Choice' in 1916 would have reacted to the Development of Will Mossop?

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Introduction

Bryony Hughes 10 RSW English Coursework How do you think the audience at the first London Performance of 'Hobson's Choice' in 1916 would have reacted to the Development of Will Mossop? In 1916, life was very different to how it is today. Status was a very important thing and people were very conscious of the reputation of their family name. The classes were very divided. For example, the people in lower class were treated with very little respect, however people in upper class were given respect by all classes. 'Hobson's Choice' is a comedy based around the battle of wills between Hobson, a hard-headed, domineering cobbler and his daughter Maggie, who defies him by marrying his most talented but timid and downtrodden worker, Will Mossop. She helps Will to develop his potential and together they turn the tables on Hobson himself. At the beginning of the play, we see that Hobson does not treat Will with a lot of respect and the difference between their classes is made very obvious. ...read more.

Middle

(Laughs) you with a husband!' She however seems to take this quite personally and sets out to prove Hobson wrong by finding herself her own husband. She takes an interest in Willie. She tells Willie that she would like to marry him and open there own business together. Willie is very surprised by this, 'Partnership! Oh that's a different thing. I thought you were axing me to wed you.' 'I am.' Willie does not seem completely happy with the idea of marrying Maggie, but soon finds it more appealing and becomes willing. Hobson is very unhappy with this idea. When he finds out about the arrangement, he insists on beating Willie with a belt, however Willie with his new found confidence stands up to Hobson which takes him by great surprise and also makes Maggie very proud. 'Willie! I knew you had it in you lad!' Maggie's sisters also seem very unenthusiastic about her engagement to Will. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is a very noticeable change in Willie's personality, for example we see at the beginning of the book that he is unable to read and his speech is also of a poor standard, however by the end of the book it has improved immensely. 'I dare say. But you'll not speak as well as he did.' They are taken by surprise when he speaks so well, and although they do find it hard to accept Will into the family as he was originally of working class, we can see by the end of the play that they do start to accept him more. At the beginning of play because he is treated do badly, I think that the audience will feel sorry for him but as he develops in to a strong character then they will start to respect him and accept him more just like the other members of the Hobson family. ...read more.

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