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How do you think Victor Frankenstein failed or erred as a human being? What traits or attributes do you think led to the creature's fate?

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Introduction

How do you think Victor Frankenstein failed or erred as a human being? What traits or attributes do you think led to the creature's fate? People, since the very beginning of creation, have made mistakes. Some bigger than others but still, there is no human who has made no mistakes in his life. This is part of the human nature and no matter how much people try, they will always make some mistake, even if it is a very small one. Mistakes exist for one reason and that is to learn from them and to understand that there is always some consequence that has to be dealt with when doing anything. Victor Frankenstein had to learn this the hard way, after he made the huge mistake of giving life to a creature, a mistake that led to his and the creatures' miserable fate. Humans are in essence, good individuals, who care about others, who are innocent and believe in goodness. With evolution, this essence has not changed, but humans itself change it as they grow up. This essence filled with goodness is transformed during the transition of humans from being a child to being an adult, mainly because of the ...read more.

Middle

As any human being, Victor when noticing all these things, got scared and ran away, leaving his creation behind, all alone, worrying only about himself and having no consideration for the creature's fate, who was left like a newborn without his mother. Most humans are very selfish and worry only about themselves, and as long as they can succeed, they do not care about the effect that they can have on another person. Victor, like many other people, was a very comfortable man, who always took the easy way out of problems, and this particular case is a perfect example of that. What he did not understood in the moment he gave life to the creature, is that for every action, there is an effect or a consequence that has to be dealt with. Frankenstein realized, with the death of his brother, Justine, Elizabeth and Henry, that there is a price to pay for your mistakes and that you just cannot run away from your problems. Frankenstein, as the creature's creator, was responsible for his creation's fate since he played the role of the mother. ...read more.

Conclusion

So at the end, both Victor and the creature's lives ended up in misery and suffering, mainly produced by loneliness, and all due to one mistake made by a selfish person, a mistake that was big enough to ruin two lives. In conclusion, it is part of the human nature to make mistakes, and it is not a bad thing as long as people learn from their errors. However, this does not justify what Victor did because he committed a huge mistake when interfering with the natural order of things, getting involved with forces much superior than anything humans can get involved with. He did not entirely fail as a human being because it is part of the adult human nature to adequate his essence and becoming many times selfish and afraid. Victor is just another scared and insecure human being who is terrified with the idea of not satisfying the society, and because of this, tried to escape from a huge mistake he made instead of trying to accept the consequences for his actions. He was just an ordinary person who had to deal with an extraordinary situation caused by a huge mistake produced when trying to fulfill his dream, and who unfortunately became responsible for the miserable and lonely fate of his and the creature's life. ...read more.

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