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How does Arthur Conan Doyle Manipulate the Generic Conventionsof the Genre and Audiences Expectations Deliver the Moral Messages That Victorian Society Would Have Expected?

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Introduction

How does Arthur Conan Doyle Manipulate the Generic Conventions of the Genre and Audiences Expectations Deliver the Moral Messages That Victorian Society Would Have Expected? "The Adventure of the speckled band" and "The Man with the twisted lip" were both written by Arthur Conan Doyle, both told in first person by Doctor Watson and the main character was Sherlock Holmes who solved mysteries as a hobby. The stories were writes at the turn of the 1900's. The stories were first available in 1887. The Sherlock Holmes murder mystery investigations were not initially first published in books, they were originally shown in serial form in the strand magazine. A lot of stories where publishes so that the audience were familiar with the Holmes investigation techniques, now they new what to expect of the generic conventions. ...read more.

Middle

Arthur Conan Doyle creates an image of a wild animal, a predator or a savage beast. Doctor Roylott is described as a "fierce old bird of prey" and when leaving the apartment he "snarled like a vicious dog". Being described as a 'bird of prey' makes him seem as if he will pounce at any moment and very bloodthirsty. Roylott reinforces these views of himself by attempting to intimidate Holmes and Watson, he warns them that he is a "dangerous man" threatening them that if they interfere they will suffer too. In "The Man with the Twisted Lip" the villain, Hugh Boon is described as having "a shock of orange hair, pale faced with a disfigured, horrible scar protruding his lip" this suggests that he has had a violent past which makes him a typical villain, he seams unreal with inhuman features. ...read more.

Conclusion

Her mother was well off so Helen stood to inherit money which made her a target to her stepfather. The crime in both stories is atypical because in "The Adventure of the speckled band" there is no weapon; it's a snake which subverts the generic expectations. In "The Man with the Twisted Lip", there is no crime committed even though it is a murder mystery. Sherlock Holmes investigates the mystery and finds the villain was the victim. In "The Adventure of the speckled band", the investigation is atypical because Holmes in investigating how not who. The crime and investigation in both stories subverts the generic expectations. The detectives in both stories are atypical because Holmes does it for a hobby, the enjoyment and "mental stimulation". Doctor Roylott was hoist by his own petard and, in the end, Neville St. Clare was barred from begging ever gain. The message of the story was, clearly, that crime does not pay. ?? ?? ?? ?? Coursework Alex Harris ...read more.

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