• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Arthur Miller show the strains on the Carbone household in the scene where the audience first meets Eddie, Catherine and Beatrice?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Arthur Miller show the strains on the Carbone household in the scene where the audience first meets Eddie, Catherine and Beatrice? A View from the Bridge is mainly about a man called Eddie Carbone, a docker who lives and works in New York. He migrated from Sicily with his wife Beatrice and her neice Catherine. He has worked very hard to bring Catherine up. His relationship with his wife Beatrice is quite good. However, they have been going through a rough patch at the moment due to which their sexual relationship has been suffering. Like a father, Eddie is very protective of Catherine and as time goes on he realises that he is too close to Catherine. As you can see there are a lot of strains between the people of the household. However, when Beatrice's cousins arrive, things get considerably worse. Marco and Rodolpho have come from Sicily as illegal immigrants and have to be kept hidden. They should be kept hidden as it is part of the Sicilian code of honour. Rodolpho, the younger of the two brothers, and Catherine fall in love. When Eddie realises he goes crazy with jealousy. He becomes so determined to get rid of Rodolpho and Marco that he snitches to the immigration authority even though he knows that his own community will treat him as an outcast. ...read more.

Middle

However, Catherine starts to flirt with Eddie, she runs her hand over her skirt and says 'you like it?'. She is trying to impress Eddie. The flirting suggests that their relationship is more of a boyfriend and girlfriend type relationship than a relationship between an uncle and his niece. Eddie continues to compliment Catherine and she tries to impress him further. Eddie then hears about Catherine's new job. Immediately he disapproves even before hearing what sort of job it is: BEATRICE She's got a job Pause EDDIE looks at CATHERINE then back to BEATRICE EDDIE What job she's gonna finish school This again shows that Eddie is overprotective like a father, however he is too overprotective, this is because he doesn't want her to leave shool, he wants her to remain a child. Eventually Eddie tells her she can have the job but he says it reluctantly, he says she 'will leave' home then visit 'once a month, than Christmas and new years finally'. Even though Catherine has got Eddie's approval she is distraught that she hasn't pleased him: CATHERINE (grasping his arm to reassure him and to erase the accusation) No, please! Catherine sees Eddie as a father and that is the reason she is always trying to please him. We know that Eddie is angry with the fact that Catherine has got a job however, he takes his anger out on Beatrice not Catherine: EDDIE (To Beatrice - strangely and quickly resentful) ...read more.

Conclusion

He wants her to remain in school so that their relationship remains close. Eddies relationship with Catherine is fine when she is a child as she belongs to him and nobody else can get in the way of their closeness. However, he cannot have that sort of closeness with a grown woman, which Catherine is, unless he is in a sexual relationship with her. That is the reason that he wants her to remain a child, so that he doesn't have to accept the fact that he has sexual feelings for her. In the first scene Miller shows that Eddie still thinks of Catherine being a baby and in this first the audience also realise that Eddie and Catherine's relationship will start to disintegrate as Catherine grows into a mature young woman. The play would have ended in tragedy with or without the arrival of Marco and Rodolpho as there were no other possible endings to the story. It couldn't end with Eddie and Catherine getting together as it would be morally unjust. In the story Eddie's feelings for Catherine were too strong. The tragedy could have if Eddie had just admitted his feelings for Catherine to himself, but the influence of his culture and personality didn't allow him to. Also if he did admit his feelings there would have been no point to the story. The arrival of Marco and Rodolpho just speeded things up a notch or two. But really even if they didn't turn up the story would have ended in tragedy with the inevitable death of Eddie. Salman Uddin 11M 2325 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Miller section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Miller essays

  1. How does Arthur Miller show the strains on the Carbone household in the scene ...

    Eddie calms Beatrice down and says that she has such a heart that he will end up on the floor for the night. Catherine reminds Beatrice that she has to say her news to Eddie. Beatrice sits Eddie down for dinner then tells him that Catherine has got a job

  2. Discussing how effectively Arthur Miller portrays Eddie Carbone

    Then the speed of the second act shows that Eddie wants to get everything over and done with but knows that it's wrong. We see Eddie hurtling uncontrollably towards his own fate. This is highlighted by shorter scenes and fewer lengthy set pieces.

  1. Why and How Does Eddie Carbone Change As The Play Progresses? What Leads to ...

    "You used to be different, Beatrice... ...I'm no different". It's almost like he changes so much (or so much more is revealed about him) that he makes himself distant to those he cares for, so distant that they're unable to help him. When readers realise that he has failed to protect Catherine and has failed to retrieve his good

  2. 'A View from the Bridge' - How does Arthur Miller show the strains on ...

    Eddie calms Beatrice down and says that she has such a heart that he will end up on the floor for the night. Catherine reminds Beatrice that she has to say her news to Eddie. Beatrice sits Eddie down for dinner then tells him that Catherine has got a job

  1. What does Arthur Miller want the audience to think about Eddie Carbone? Base the ...

    feel differences in his own office "the flat air in my office suddenly washes in with the green scent of the sea," and knows something is going to go wrong and that he and any1 else are incapable of stopping that very thing, "another lawyer, quite differently dressed, heard the

  2. Directing the first sceen of 'The Crucibal'.

    Reverend hale of Beverly now arrives on the scene; he is an expert in witchcraft. He arrives bloated with information and books 'weighted with authority' setting out to establish witchcraft in Salem. Soon enough he does and Tituba is forced to break down and confess her dealings with the devil.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work