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How does Brontё use Jane Eyre to show her views on Society

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Introduction

How does Bront? use Jane Eyre to show her views on Society Jane Eyre is a novel by Charlotte Bront�. In the novel's first and second chapters, Jane Eyre is a nine or ten year-old orphan. We learn a great deal about her as well, as we are told that she lives with her auntie, Mrs Reed, and her cousins, Eliza, Jack, and Georgiana. Her uncle, Mr Reed, passed away 9 years ago ("Mr Reed had been dead nine years"). Bront� uses Jane Eyre as a way to direct her views on society towards the reader, for example when Bront� expresses her opinions on gender equality "Women are supposed to be very calm generally; but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do". Gender equality was not the only view that Bront� used Jane Eyre to demonstrate; she also uses the studiousness of Jane to illustrate that women can be educated properly, no matter from what background. The fact that Jane was self-educated further strengthened her proposals. In the first two chapters, Jane is very observant and intelligent: "The red-room was a spare chamber. ...read more.

Middle

With this courage, she says, "I am not deceitful: if I were, I should say I loved you; but I declare I do not love you: I dislike you the worst of anybody in the world except John Reed; and this book about the liar, you may give it to your girl, Georgiana, for it is she who tells lies, and not I." (Chapter 4). In this quotation, Jane is talking to Mrs Reed, and is courageously telling her Bront?'s views, that, through the novel, affect the reader by making them think about it. Jane is also very imaginative. This also refers back to her observance, and how much she matures throughout the early stages of the novel: "Each picture told a story; mysterious often to my undeveloped understanding and imperfect feelings, yet ever profoundly interesting: as interesting as the tales Bessie sometimes narrated on winter evenings, when she chanced to be in good humour...fed our eager attention with passages of love and adventure taken from fairy tales and older ballads...With Bewick on my knee, I was then happy: happy at least in my way." (Chapter 1). This characteristic is used again to show how Jane escapes the hardship of her childhood. ...read more.

Conclusion

The audience feels empathy because they hear Jane's point of view on the world, and her "bias" views give us an impression of the world and the people inside it. Because we can only see Jane's world from her perspective, we gather an image Jane lonely and deprived, therefore we empathise towards her. Overall, Jane Eyre is successfully used as a mouth-piece for Charlotte Bront?'s views on society and general life. The novel Jane Eyre illustrates for the reader an image of gender inequality against women, by discussing how women need the same amount of love and care that men get, at any stage in life. Jane Eyre also shows Bront?'s view on religion; for example, when Miss Abbot threatens Jane with God striking her dead in the middle of the night. Later on in the book, Bront? gives the reader an insight into her own views on religion, by showing how Jane creates her own personal view on religion. Social status is also a major theme described throughout Jane Eyre by Bront?. In Jane Eyre, Bront? gives her view that everyone, no matter what social status, should be given the necessary amounts of love, care, and education. To sum-up, Jane Eyre is a successful mouth-piece for Bront?'s views of religion, social status and gender inequality. ?? ?? ?? ?? - 1 - ...read more.

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