• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Bronte arouse sympathy for Jane Eyre in the first chapter of the novel?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Bronte arouse sympathy for Jane Eyre in the first chapter of the novel? This essay is about the novel Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte. I am going to explain how Bronte makes the reader feel sympathy towards Jane using several different methods. The novel Jane Eyre follows Jane's life from when she is a little girl through her unhappy childhood and into adult life. It is written through the eyes of Jane and informs us of her every emotion and exactly what is happening in immense detail. Chapter one of Jane Eyre The first chapter opens with the line 'There was no possibility of a walk that day.' This immediately draws our attention. We wonder why there is no possibility of a walk and want to read on and discover the reason. We presume that Jane goes on walks and that something might be wrong or because she cannot go on one today. It then goes on to say that they 'had been wandering' in the morning and still we wonder why she could go in the morning and not now. ...read more.

Middle

Jane is excluded from the group. As soon as Mrs Reed talks we know that she is mean, the way she snaps and favours her children to Jane. The whole family is described as bullying and we automatically feel for Jane, as she has to live with them and behave carefully to avoid further disfavour. Jane lives along with her cousins - Eliza, Georgiana and John Reed. Eliza and Georgiana are described as not being as horrible as John. He is 'a schoolboy of fourteen years old; four years older than I, for I was ten' so we recognize the fact that he is older than her and could pick on her if he wants. We then find out what he looks like 'large and stout for his age, with a dingy and unwholesome skin; thick ligaments in a spacious visage, heavy limbs and large extremities. He gorged himself habitually at the table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks.' From this striking description he doesn't sound appealing to look at, he is fat and it is obvious that he is spoilt with food and even though he is ugly, his mother still considers him beautiful. ...read more.

Conclusion

She is left out and wants to hide or get away from her troubles so sits inconspicuously in the window, the billowing curtain acts like a huge blanket to shield her from her worries. Bronte describes everything so clearly we get a perfect picture in our mind, which helps us become more involved and realise that she is very intelligent and a strong character. She needs to be clever to get on in her household; she needs to be able to stick up for herself. She is fully aware that she is not as important in the household as her cousins; she is a poor relation with no one close enough to call 'family'. As we read on we realise just how miserable her life is and with the detailed description we can imagine how uncomfortable her situation is. We feel sympathy as she tries to fit in but does not succeed because everyone has already formed his or her opinion of her and she cannot change that. She is only ten years old and we are impressed by her maturity of thought and behaviour. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. Charlotte Bronte is a prime example of a woman who had already triumphantly demonstrated ...

    of the sufferings and miseries that marked the daily routine of the girls boarding at Cowan Bridge. They were probably the first stimulus in her developments as a creative writer, just as Lowood in the book is seen to be a strong influence in the early development of Jane's character.

  2. Jane Eyre: Chapter 26 Essay

    that sentence it was never "broken by a reply; not, even in a hundred years." Subsequently, Rochester is presented as weak against God's law. In the quote, "Mr. Rochester moved slightly as if an earthquake had rolled under his feet" the use of metaphor to express Rochester reaction to the earthquake as he "moved slightly" shows Rochester's attempt at control.

  1. Jane Eyre Essay

    looked like, because she is curious and wants to compare herself to Blanche. In this chapter Mason is introduced "his manner is polite, his accent, in speaking, struck me as being somewhat unusual-not precisely foreign, but still not altogether English."

  2. How Charlotte Bronte makes the reader sympathy towards Jane Eyre in the opening chapters

    Jane not wanting to make thing worse for her so asks Master John "What do you want?" Master John makes Jane feel inferior, by speaking to him like he would one of his servants- "Say, What do you want Master Reed".

  1. Choose three episodes in the novel "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte, spanning her childhood ...

    They remind her of her obligation to Mrs Reed but she stubbornly refuses to acknowledge it. Despite their attempts at chastening her, determination and willpower shine through in Jane's battle to escape. Jane's continual questioning of the servants is to no avail as she is counter attacked with threats of hell and of being sent to a poorhouse.

  2. Examine the presentation of Jane Eyres childhood in chapter 1-8 and discuss the way ...

    In chapter two, more of Jane's characteristics are revealed to how she reacts to her surroundings and how people treat her. "I resisted all the way; a new thing for me." Showing how Jane reacts to major tremor in her young life, throughout her childhood of the first 8 chapters.

  1. How does Charlotte Bronte prepare us for a change in Jane's life in chapter ...

    She goes onto tell us about her pupil, Adele Varens. "She had no great talents, no marked traits of character, no peculiar development of feeling or taste" Adele is Jane's pupil, she a young French girl. Once again Jane picks on Adele's boring edge; she describes how Adele has nothing peculiar about her.

  2. Jane Eyre Chapter 1-26

    by letting Jane remind us that even when she is free she must still be restrained by others: 'Liberty, Excitement, Enjoyment: delightful sounds truly; but no more than that for me; and so hollow and fleeting that it is a mere waste of time to listen to them. But servitude!

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work