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How does Bronte show the reader Jane's resilience to events that occur in the novel? How successful is she as a heroine?

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Introduction

How does Bronte show the reader Jane's resilience to events that occur in the novel? How successful is she as a heroine? When describing someone as 'resolute', it is to say that the person has the ability to cope with pressures they are put under and still end up coming out of the situation as a stronger person. Jane's character is a perfect example of this. She has to cope in many difficult positions she faces, and ends up as the heroine of the novel. Jane's growing understanding of the world is shown frequently throughout the novel. As a child, she tends to believe she can say and do as she pleases, but as the novel progresses and Jane's character matures, her understanding of the world develops. Bronte wishes the reader to admire Jane for always being optimistic and the unique strength of character she displays. It is important to note how Jane is treated by her relatives as her temper plays a vital part in the way she copes during her childhood. In her early life, Jane regularly comes in contact with John Reed, a rude, nasty bully. ...read more.

Middle

Mrs Reed has asked to see Jane because of the guilt she had held since moving Jane to Lowood. She reveals that she has broken her promise to her late husband by not bringing Jane up as one of her own, and she has also lied to Jane's uncle John Eyre saying that Jane had died at Lowood. Jane being the resilient person she is, responds in the manor you'd expect and says, " My disposition is not so bad as you think: I am passionate, but not vindictive" This quote explains to us, how even after Mrs Reed has deprived Jane of a fortune and a comfortable life, Jane still finds it in her heart to forgive Mrs Reed. She tells her aunt how she is "passionate" and doesn't hold grudges. This shows that Jane has grown as a character to love her enemies and forgive them for the mistakes they make. When Jane Eyre learns on her wedding day that her true love, Mr Rochester, already has a wife, she is faced with a conflict between her love for this man and her moral duty to God. ...read more.

Conclusion

The words "Great" and "delusion" emphasise how surprised he is to hear Jane's voice. She tells Rochester that she is financially independent with �5000. Jane offers Rochester her hand in marriage and he accepts. Jane heroic nature is what causes her to go return to her true love and she realises Rochester is the man she wants to live the rest of her life with. Over the course of the novel, Jane's character develops from a rebellious child to a wife, devoted to her much older husband. She learns to accept, let things go, and to forgive. Jane's resilience proves to be an important factor in the manor she copes when under pressure. During Jane's childhood she lashes out at John after he'd badly tormented her. She got the blame, but still argued her case. Development is only shown later on in the novel when Jane visits Mrs Reed. She is told of how she could have been rich and lived a comfortable life. Jane, instead of having an outburst, forgave Mrs Reed because she wished for her to go to heaven and not hell. Her courage and bravery, shown throughout the novel, demonstrates Jane as a heroic character. In the end Jane came out the winner and rightfully deserving her happy life with Rochester. ...read more.

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