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How does chapter five relate to the main themes and issues of the novel Frankenstein as a whole?

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Introduction

Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein when she was eighteen years old. At the time, scientists were experimenting with electricity and one of the things they were trying to achieve was to give life to dead beings. Twenty years before Shelley wrote Frankenstein Luigi Galvani, a scientist, found that electricity could be used to cause muscles in the dead to spasm, opening the door to the possibility that reanimation was possible. It was in this frame of mind that Shelley began writing her novel; Galvani is mentioned in the novel. A key theme in the novel is mans everlasting pursuit to one day be God; and desire to obtain a god-like role and create life. But when man tries, he fails and this failure is represented by the monster that Dr. ...read more.

Middle

It hated him for giving it life, it was alone and isolated from the rest of the society, different. Dr. Frankenstein's reasons for creating the monster may have been noble. He may have wanted to help mankind, conquer death and diseases. Having done this and achieving his goal, looking at his creation and its ugliness, he turns away and flees from the monster he has created. Mary Shelly puts out the point that Dr. Frankenstein lacks willingness to accept responsibility for his actions. His creation only becomes a monster after abandoning it. To the creature Frankenstein is his father and when he left him, he felt neglected and abandoned, not knowing how to take care of himself. So he left not knowing where he would go or how he would survive. ...read more.

Conclusion

Neglecting it and improper mothering was what led to monster survive on its own. After having been rejected and attacked again and again by the people he runs into only because of his horrible bodily features, the Monster, alone and left on his own, develops a deadly hatred against his creator Frankenstein and against all of mankind. Therefore only society is to blame for the dangerous threat to mankind that the Monster has become. Every person he came in contacted with immediately hated him. Nobody could look past his horrified appearance to see what was inside. His hatred then turned into revenge against his creator. The creature wanted Frankenstein to feel what he feels. ?? ?? ?? ?? Asadullah Haider English Frankenstein Coursework: How does chapter five relate to the main themes and issues of the novel Frankenstein as a whole? ...read more.

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