• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Charles Dickens create sympathy for Pip in chapters 1 and 8

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Charles Dickens create sympathy for pip in chapters 1 and 8 When we first start to read the story it is immediately obvious that Dickens is telling the story in the first person though the eyes of Pip. This is likely to cause us to see the story from his point of view. At the beginning of Great Expectations we immediately start to feel sympathy for Pip when he tells us that his mother and farther have died, that he has never seen a picture of them and because of this he has to create a picture in his mind from their tombstones and we get the feeling that he spends a lot of time visiting them. Then also the fact that we find out that his five little brothers have died "to five little stone lozenge's each about a foot and a half long each arranged in a nest row" creates even more sympathy and emotion towards Pip. ...read more.

Middle

He then starts to shout and threaten Pip "keep still you little devil or I will cut your throat" which by this causes Pip out of pure terror to beg for his own life "Oh! Don't cut my throat, sir" "pray don't do it, sir." The terrible man then asks Pip to "pint" out the place where he lives. The man then shows abuse to Pip by turning him upside down and emptying his pockets and Pip has all of nothing but a piece of bread. This shows us that Pip is poor creating yet more sympathy, but yet the "terrible man" still carries on and eats the piece of bread creating more sympathy for Pip because we start to build an image in our heads of this helpless, vulnerable boy being tipped upside down and emptied of his pockets. ...read more.

Conclusion

Pip even if he tries to hide "a boy may lock his door, may be warm in bed, may draw the clothes over his head, may think himself comfortable and safe, but that young man will softly creep up and creep his way to him and tear him open". Even though Pip is being faced by this terrible man he is still always polite this gives us great respect and sympathy for him as it gives us the impression he has been brought up well and has not done anything wrong in life to anybody and this terrible thing is happening to him. When the man leaves and Pip starts to leave for home he sees a gibbet seeing this must make Pip even more scared because this is what could happen to him if he is caught stealing the things for the man. He then runs home without stopping. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. How does dickens create sympathy for pip in chapters 1 and 8?

    even managed to gather a image of what they probably would looked like. After an introduction to Pip's background Dickens now goes on to explain where he lives. He does this in great detail as is shown in these sentences "Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within,

  2. How does Dickens create sympathy for Pip in the opening chapters of great Expectations(TM)

    But what was sadder was the fact that when he did this all that came out of Pips pocket was "a piece of bread" which emphasise how poor Pip actually is. Or the way he calls Pip a "Dog" just shows his rudeness and displays Pip as a small, low, vulnerable person.

  1. How does Charles Dickens create effective images of people and places in chapters 1 ...

    The description of Satis house continues in this manner. He also mentions windows were barred and cemented. This makes the house seem daunting. Dickens also makes you acknowledge the houses former glory by saying "there were no pigeons in the dove cot, no horses in the stable, no pigs in

  2. How Does Dickens Create Sympathy in Chapters 1 and 8 of Great Expectations?

    This is because of the keyword 'little,' it creates a reductive image amongst the other keywords and phrases such as 'gave up' and 'Universal Struggle.' Dickens uses huge long sentences that create bathos. Pip is isolated, alone, orphaned and we feel sorry for him.

  1. great expectations Chapter 8

    think the lower class people are not proper humans they should not be treated fairly as they are. Dickens is showing the differences attitudes between the two classes. Other way Dickens show the different class through Estella, when Estella gets food for Pip she leaves him with a plate of

  2. Analysis of chapters 1-8 in Great Expectation by Charles Dickens

    When Magwitch asks Pip to point out the place he lives, it is stated that he lives "a mile or more from the church". This scares the reader as they begin to feel that Pip is in a helpless situation and is in trouble.

  1. Great Expectations - Chapter 8

    Satis House itself is important in the novel. It is used by Dickens as a symbol of everything that Pip is not when he first goes there and its appearance in Chapter 8 suggests that this chapter might be seen as a pivotal point where things will never be the same again afterwards.

  2. How does Charles Dickens create sympathy for characters in Chapters 1 and 8 of ...

    Pip then describes the 'five little stone lozenges' arranged beside the graves, which belonged to his five little brothers. This tragic story hits the reader immediately and no other introduction is needed, since this situation is at once compelling and dramatic.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work