• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Does Charles Dickens Portray Deprivation and Attempts to Relieve Poverty in the First Four Chapters of Oliver Twist

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Does Charles Dickens Portray Deprivation and Attempts to Relieve Poverty in the First Four Chapters of Oliver Twist Charles Dickens wrote Oliver Twist in the 19th century. He used his personal past experiences to give the book a personal feeling to the book. During Charles Dickens' childhood his farther was stolen from him and placed in prison, this left him with only his mother with bills forcing them into poverty. In Oliver Twist he is all alone with his mother being stolen from him at birth this left him with no parents being born into a workhouse, Charles Dickens also lived and worked in a workhouse therefore he knew how the people where treated, how the wealthier staff looked down and despised the lower class. Charles Dickens put all of these past experiences into Oliver Twist, writing the book from an autobiographical point of view. Oliver Twist was born straight into the workhouse during his birth his mother died, Oliver Twist was lucky to have survived the birth as infant mortality was extremely high in such poor conditions, his mother had given birth to thirteen children and only two survived. The staff who delivered Oliver Twist seemed not to care, it wasn't that they didn't like what they where doing but who they where doing it for. ...read more.

Middle

Mr. Bumble's evil personality is revealed when he makes a cruel joke the number of infant deaths in the workhouse. He is a large, well fed plump person who in comparison to the small and fragile Oliver is enormous. Mr. Bumble is a bully, this is demonstrated by the way he grasps his cane and uses firm words with Mrs. Mann. When speaking eloquently he makes obvious mistakes, when speaking with Mrs. Mann he pronounces aware as "aweer". Oliver is eventually offered accompanied by five pounds to the first half decent person to walk into the workhouse. Mr. Gamfield the local chimney sweep went for Oliver and the five pounds. The board refused to give Oliver to him as Mr. Gamfield had a negative track record, he had taken orphans before and they had died under his care. Dickens made it obvious that Mr. Gamfield wanted Oliver for all of the wrong reasons. He only wanted Oliver as a personal slave and to labour for him as he small enough to get up the chimneys, the five pounds also helped to convince him to enter the workhouse Mr. Gamfield like many other adults in his life was cruel and violent We can see this with his donkey "he catches hold of the bridal and gives the jay a sharp wrench". ...read more.

Conclusion

Oliver is terrified of Mr. Gamfield he openly shows his emotion to the whole board of the workhouse when in chapter three he falls to his knees, praying that they would order him back the room, that they would starve him, beat him, kill him. He prays for all of this rather than them send him away with Mr. Gamfield In the time of workhouses the standard of living was near to none. The unwealthy basically had no choice to but to enter a workhouse. They would work for a roof and little food. All of the people in the workhouse had to sleep on the hard floor and receive poor medical attention. Overall the living condition were appalling, Charles Dickens uses irony to create a feeling of how bad the conditions where, a good example of this is that nearly every member of staff is overweight even them giving out the tiny amount of gruel to the orphans. Dickens attempts to create a feeling of pity for the orphans, by doing this we can see that he is trying to relive poverty, stop other people from going through what he went through. Dickens somehow manages to take a subject as important as poverty and put it across by using humor, and at the same time still manages to keep that feeling of seriousness. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Oliver Twist section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Oliver Twist essays

  1. Charles Dickens uses Oliver Twist to make social comments on attitudes towards crime and ...

    come to Z' He is someone who enjoys having power over people who are less fortunate than himself or in worse circumstances than him, and enjoys abusing this power. With Mr Bumble, Dickens is showing how uncaring the people in the system are to the poor children.

  2. How effectively does Charles Dickens use language to portray 19th century London society in ...

    This section of society is quite different from the upper class or the lower class of society. This was a class that consisted of wanted men, filthy boys and women of ill repute or in Dickens' words, 'where drunken men and women were positively wallowing in filth' This is quite

  1. Oliver Twist

    Also, as Dickens points out, the officials who ran the workhouses took advantage of their power. Their greed, laziness and arrogance is described of the charitable workers like Mrs. Mann and Mr. Bumble. Overall, the charitable institutions only let the terrible conditions reoccur because the poor would live like that in anyway.

  2. THROUGH AN EXPLORATION OF THE WAYS THAT DICKENS PRESENTS OLIVER TWIST, DISCUSS WHAT DICKENS ...

    a little affection for Oliver and acts like he may have a heart after all. 'Mr Bumble regarded Oliver's piteous and helpless look with some astonishment for a few seconds' Bumble then tells the boy to wipe his eyes and carries on walking with Oliver's hand in his.

  1. How does Charles Dickens create sympathy for Oliver Twist in the first four chapters?

    His soft chubby hands spread widely across the bed, for he lay on it big frame alone, and if ever he was to wake up it did probably be his mum come to give him a goodnight kiss or his nanny come to see if he was alright and even

  2. How effectively does Oliver Twist represent the 19th century orphans in the novel 'Oliver ...

    The orphans were abused mentally as well as physically. They were very sensitive and couldn't fight back as they were kept in a bad condition and as they were children they were weak and couldn't fight physically or mentally. The orphans are abused and labeled "un-grateful, mur-de-rous, hor-rid-villian".

  1. How suitably does Charles Dickens portrays the misery of the 19th century orphans in ...

    Oliver Twist was one of the orphans kept in the workhouse. He escapes to London as he is fed up with all the abuse and the illtreatment shown to them . "a parish child -the orphan of the workhouse - the humble ,half starved drudge - to be cuffed and

  2. Oliver Twist - Board Scene

    for the first time, he has no idea of what the board is "Not having a very clearly defined notion of what a live board was, Oliver was rather astounded by this intelligence, and was not quite sure whether he ought to laugh or cry."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work